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1993 S10 2.5l standard, lowered on staggered rallys, 1992 ext cab 4x4 4.3 auto
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41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey yall
Im excited to work on my 92 4x4 tahoe s10 when I return from college in 4 weeks. Im thinking of lifting it after I fix the rear main seal because it sits just about as low as my actually lowered 2wd s10, I don't know if its super sacked out or what, I towed the truck home and I haven't touched it since

I digress, the point is, it sits lower than I want/ seen on any other first gen 4x4 s10 (if someone has an idea as to why please let me know)

I am thinking of doing the RC 2.5inch suspension lift, or if funds are tight ill buy lift shackles, coil spacers, torsion keys- lift around 2inches, If I feel up to it I would do a 2 inch body lift too although I am not a huge fan of body lifts.

I would want some aggressive tires to give it a nicer stance. This is the first time I've ever messed around with wheels and tires on a vehicle so bear with me

What size rim could I run on the truck? Im looking at used tires and Im like the look of something like a 265/70/17
I know stock they came with 14 or 15 inch rims...

What size tires and wheels do people recommend on lifted first gens

Thanks in advance for the help!

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2003 Sonoma SLS ext. cab 4.3L / 4x4
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589 Posts
I'm not well versed on the 1st gen S10 wheels, but on the 2nd gen there is a very distinct difference bewtween 2WD and 4WD wheels; the backspacing is the primary factor. It's definitely something (among others) to check on before diving into wheel purchasing.

I have always run the stock suspension systems on the trucks I have had so I am pretty useless in that area. However, I do know there is a whole host of interelated factors to consider to achieve a proper and safe (lift) modification. There are quite a few articles here on the Forum that address this and I'm sure other more knowledeable members will chime in to help you.

And if you are considering used tires, there are a multitude of factors to take into account. Issues such as tread depth remaining, tire wear (uniformity &/or nonuniformity), compatibility with the selected wheels, tire age (manufacture date is molded on the sidewall), possible dry rot, possible tire damage (sidewall cracking/punctures/bubbles/ patches) are some of the variables I'd strongly review. A good overview/ primer on tires' nomenclature and the meanings can be found on the TireRack website. There is a lot to digest, so be patient and take your time. My personal inclination is to bypass used tires and get new ones. I consider used tires as a real dice throw. Tires are an important safety item on any vehicle, just like brakes, and I certainly wouldn't buy used brakes.
 
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