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I believe to weld Titanium, you have to completly enclose the part being welded in an inert atmoshpere. In other words you'd have a sealed box, full og Argon, to weld it, not just what comes out of the torch tip.
 

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lame-o
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I believe to weld Titanium, you have to completly enclose the part being welded in an inert atmoshpere. In other words you'd have a sealed box, full og Argon, to weld it, not just what comes out of the torch tip.
you are correct! Or you can make a trailing cap for your torch (which is kinda hokey, but it will work ok) You need to keep the metal blanketed in argon until it cools.

Also Ti filler is close to $100/lb retail

I am not 100% on welding it to SS, but I don't believe so

t
 

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check a site called metalmeet.com. you don't need to fully enclose the material and the normal torch cup will work. however you need a certain tungsten and the filler rod is expensive. look on ebay for filler rod about half price of a welding supply store.
 

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http://www.s10forum.com/forum/f147/titanium-welding-166558/

the former lab manager at my office welded some together. No idea what grade the Ti is, but I've drug on it and it's holding fine. He did not use any filler that I recall and not sure what tungsten. But I know he read up on it breifly before doing it so maybe he held the cup over the weld after the pass to try and blow argon over the weld. :dunno:
 

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i went to my books and read up on how to weldt two different alloys together. the only way to weld to unlike alloys is by blast welding or friction welding. both are way out of reach for us commoners. in blast welding they use explosives to blast two alloys together(this is how they stainless coat the inside of fuel tanks at gas stations) and friction welding with uses ultrasonic sound waves to literally rub the two piece together.

And you dont neccesarily need filler rod but the weld would definatly be under cut and not as strong
 

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I am surprised your books didn't mention anything like this:
a few quick quotes I found:

"What really separates titanium welding from most other types of GTAW is the need for an argon cover on the weld’s back side. Wherever the titanium is heated, brittle alpha-case can form. For very complex parts with interior passages or parts that require a lot of welding repairs, glove boxes may offer an economical answer. For parts too large to fit through the glove box, special flexible polyethylene plastic bags, complete with attached gloves, can be used. Use a purge monitor to see when the bag contains clean-enough argon, strike an arc, and weld away. Working in airtight gloves, especially for extended periods, can be hot, but doing so is part of the challenge of working with titanium."

"Gas-tungsten arc welding is the most widely used process for joining titanium and titanium alloys except for parts with thick sections. Square-groove butt joints can be welded without filler metal in base metals up to 2.5 mm thick. For thicker base metals, the joint should be grooved, and filler metal is required. The heated weld metal in the weld zone must be shielded from the atmosphere to prevent contamination with oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon, which will degrade the weldment ductility."

welding it to dissimilar metals

"Titanium reacts readily with air, moisture, grease, dirt, refractories, and most other metals to form brittle compounds. Reaction of titanium with gases and fluxes makes common welding processes such as gas welding, shielded metal arc, flux cored arc, and submerged arc welding unsuitable. Likewise, welding titanium to most dissimilar metals is not feasible, because titanium forms brittle compounds with most other metals; however, titanium can be welded to zirconium, tantalum and niobium."
 

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I am surprised your books didn't mention anything like this:
a few quick quotes I found:

"What really separates titanium welding from most other types of GTAW is the need for an argon cover on the weld’s back side. Wherever the titanium is heated, brittle alpha-case can form. For very complex parts with interior passages or parts that require a lot of welding repairs, glove boxes may offer an economical answer. For parts too large to fit through the glove box, special flexible polyethylene plastic bags, complete with attached gloves, can be used. Use a purge monitor to see when the bag contains clean-enough argon, strike an arc, and weld away. Working in airtight gloves, especially for extended periods, can be hot, but doing so is part of the challenge of working with titanium."

"Gas-tungsten arc welding is the most widely used process for joining titanium and titanium alloys except for parts with thick sections. Square-groove butt joints can be welded without filler metal in base metals up to 2.5 mm thick. For thicker base metals, the joint should be grooved, and filler metal is required. The heated weld metal in the weld zone must be shielded from the atmosphere to prevent contamination with oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon, which will degrade the weldment ductility."

welding it to dissimilar metals

"Titanium reacts readily with air, moisture, grease, dirt, refractories, and most other metals to form brittle compounds. Reaction of titanium with gases and fluxes makes common welding processes such as gas welding, shielded metal arc, flux cored arc, and submerged arc welding unsuitable. Likewise, welding titanium to most dissimilar metals is not feasible, because titanium forms brittle compounds with most other metals; however, titanium can be welded to zirconium, tantalum and niobium."
where did you find this info i would like to read more about this. As far as the blast and friction welding im not even sure you can use these processes with titanium i just know you can use it with aluminum ,steel, and stainless
also it depends on what alloy you are welding. 6al4v i believe is the most pure of titanium which requires a complete argon shield but grade 2 titanium which has a higher aluminum content can be welded with normal tig setup. grade two is what i use to build street bike exhaust
 

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Hey Mark, did you get my PM?
 

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Titanium is pretty cool to weld but take's alot of prep before and during welding. you can weld it in a chamber of argon or just adding a trailing cup and backing plate will work fine. You gotta keep it in an Argon atmosphere while it's above 800*F, other wise the air will contaminate the weld and cause it to be brittle.​

It's alot differant then welding steel, I'm pretty sure we used the green tungsten when I did it, but basicly you want a slight gap in the metal, and when you dip the filler rod in you have to pull straight up (tward's the tungsten) or the filler rod will pinch and it become's stuck in the weld. The puddle doesn't flow like it would on steel, it's similar to stainless as far as how the puddle act's. it will also "keyhole" which basicly look's like an acorn shape which you dip the filler into and continue down the bead.​

When you finish the weld a Metalic silver color mean's that shielding was excellent and the weld has a good ductility, a light straw color ranging to a light blue indicate's the weld was not protected at low temp's but ductility is probably good both of which will be a strong weldBut if the color's are a dark straw to dark blue the weld was not adequately shielded and poor ductility is the result if it's dark blue, gray, or yellowish, or ifit has little to no lustre the shileding was extremely poor and the welds are very brittle.​

You need to keep everything clean when working with it also, clean glove's is important to keep dirt outta the material when handling it.​

The filler rod is also expensive, you can buy small amount's at www.tigdepot.com
 
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