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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please bear with me as I'm ignorant when it come to sound systems.

If a subwoofer is listed as 1200 watts max does that mean you can push it with a amp that is rms rating of 6oo? I plan on getting 2 DVC 15" subs in a sealed box and I want to push it with as much as I can without them blowing up.

I heard that the lower the ohm the more you get out it depending on your amp capabilities. I would like to wire them up in a 2 ohm setting. I have the diagram for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I due plan on getting a 2 ohm amp. It would be great if I could find and amp that I would have it set up as .5 ohms.
 

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Never look at a speaker's (or amplifier's) max rating, its completely worthless. Its a marketing ploy... look I have a 1200watt subwoofer.... that in reality can only handle half that power. RMS power handling is the spec to compare.

Ohms is a measure of resistance. Given a specific pushing force (amplifier's output), the less resistance in the circuit, the more work that's created. So yes, generally speaking wiring to a lower impedance (ohms) will give more power/output than wiring to a higher one. But as stated before, there are limits based on the amplifier's lowest stable impedance rating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Audioholic. Appreciate the info even though 30 people viewed this post.
 

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droppedxxxtreme said:
Thanks Audioholic. Appreciate the info even though 30 people viewed this post.
Glad to help. :) One thing I forgot to mention is there are amplifier lines out there that have a given output within a range of impedances, such as the newer JL Audio amplifiers. They have the same rated output between 2 and 8ohm (iirc). But, this is the exception to the rule, not the norm. Most amplifier's output scales with the resistance/ohms it sees in the circuit.
 
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