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I've got a 1997 S10 pickup, 4.3L. It started leaking fuel pretty good. The rear fuel lines are rusted out. At least one pinhole. These are the 2, metal, fuel lines that connect between the fuel tank and filter.

I am looking at repair options. I found a set of pre-made lines. Lines-to-Go part number FL1062-A1E. $178.

I like the idea of the pre-made lines. No need for bending or flairing tools.

The big question I have about a set of pre-made lines is: how to install them? They attach to the top of the frame. I can lift the bed, I've done that before. If I lift the bed, Is it possible to slip new fuel lines in? Has anyone done this before? Looks really tight for a pre-bent line.

What other options would there be? I see some guys on youtube using rubber tubing and various splices, compression couplers, etc. Rubber tubing and clamps look janky for high pressure fuel.
 

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Nylon isn't bad but Nickel Copper is supreme I tell ya. Nothing beats simple flare connections, double if you please, and brass unions. Gets me fired up just thinking about it. I can't wholly recommend rubber line and hose clamps on any system over 40psi. Removing the bed is definitely the way to go. DO NOT go steel line, it's too hard to work with and will just rust again no matter what coating they put on it
 

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1995 S10 2.2 liter 5 Speed 2wd RCSB
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Electronic,
I used the Linestogo.com Lines. I also had the same Line you are referring to rust out, as well as the the return line rusted. I replaced all 4 (both FWD and AFT Pressure and Return) Lines,
It was Pretty Easy, I unbolted the bed and Lifted it with 2x4's to hold it in place. lines to go does a very nice job on those lines! mine have been in almost a year with no problems.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nylon isn't bad but Nickel Copper is supreme I tell ya. Nothing beats simple flare connections, double if you please, and brass unions. Gets me fired up just thinking about it. I can't wholly recommend rubber line and hose clamps on any system over 40psi. Removing the bed is definitely the way to go. DO NOT go steel line, it's too hard to work with and will just rust again no matter what coating they put on it
Thanks for the suggestion. I've done brake lines before. I remember the copper/nickel is softer compared to steel. The ends of the fuel lines have different terminations. One side is a threaded nut, screws into the fuel filter. The other side plugs into a plastic hose from the tank. I would have to figure out the terminations and how to fit everything together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Electronic,
I used the Linestogo.com Lines. I also had the same Line you are referring to rust out, as well as the the return line rusted. I replaced all 4 (both FWD and AFT Pressure and Return) Lines,
It was Pretty Easy, I unbolted the bed and Lifted it with 2x4's to hold it in place. lines to go does a very nice job on those lines! mine have been in almost a year with no problems.
Its great this solution worked for you. I was looking forward to hearing other's experience with this repair solution. Thanks.
 

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2003 Sonoma SLS ext. cab 4.3L / 4x4
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I've done a fair amount of tube bending/ fabrication (by necessity), and given the option of a well made prefabricated line, it's a no brainer for me to go that route. Often, just the removal of the rusted lines and fittings is tough enough, so premade lines makes sense to me. Personally, I haven't used Lines-to-Go, but they seem to be mentioned often and well regarded. I might suggest you replace the fuel filter as well while everything is accessible and disassembled. Please keep us posted on how things turn out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Electronic,
I used the Linestogo.com Lines. I also had the same Line you are referring to rust out, as well as the the return line rusted. I replaced all 4 (both FWD and AFT Pressure and Return) Lines,
It was Pretty Easy, I unbolted the bed and Lifted it with 2x4's to hold it in place. lines to go does a very nice job on those lines! mine have been in almost a year with no problems.
Hi, I had another question. When you installed the rear lines, how difficult was it to get those 2 lines in place? There is a small area between the frame and the cab of the truck the lines run through. Thanks.
 

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The ends of the fuel lines have different terminations. One side is a threaded nut, screws into the fuel filter. The other side plugs into a plastic hose from the tank. I would have to figure out the terminations and how to fit everything together.
They make specialty tools that form these ends, at the fuel filter it's a special bubble in the tubing that holds an O-ring.

You can buy the pre-made part with the O-ring, tube nut, and a length of the tube with flares on both ends that screws into the fuel filter and adapt it further down into a simple flare or compression fitting (where it comes ready for rubber hose).

Adapting metal to nylon is a compression fitting. I am not aware of any metal to nylon that isn't a compression fitting except push to connect fittings from OEM that use a tube bubble a little before the end of the metal tube. The specialty tools may make these bubbles on the tubing but my knowledge fails me at that point. I have done things that have worked but I can't recommend these methods (common rubber line and hose clamps, double for any system over 40psi). I always got too frustrated with quick disconnects that often need a tool, rendering them no better than a flare or compression fitting. Most people just run full nylon and buy the specialty tool or run NiCopp and adapt to the factory nylon with a compression fitting
 

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1995 S10 2.2 liter 5 Speed 2wd RCSB
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When you installed the rear lines, how difficult was it to get those 2 lines in place? There is a small area between the frame and the cab of the truck the lines run through. Thanks.
The AFT lines were very easy, The Rigid Part of the Lines "Snap" right into the Holders that are attached to the frame, the Flexible part of the Lines (at the Fuel Pump Fittings) are Braided Stainless Steel and have all of the correct o-rings already installed. The Only thing wrong is the Filter they supplied was loosely installed backwards so make sure you check the arrow on the filter! The Fwd Lines were more difficult due to the routing over the transmission. I am very Happy with the decision to use them. It's expensive to Other Options But Better than having a Fuel Leak!
Good Luck
 

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1995 S10 2.2 liter 5 Speed 2wd RCSB
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I've done a fair amount of tube bending/ fabrication (by necessity), and given the option of a well made prefabricated line, it's a no brainer for me to go that route.
Yup! Been There, Brake Lines PITA! Pre-Fab is Nice! The BIG 2 Things with Autos... Fire is NO Bueno Unless it is in the Cylinder and I GOTTA STOP NOW!
 
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Thanks for the suggestion. I've done brake lines before. I remember the copper/nickel is softer compared to steel. The ends of the fuel lines have different terminations. One side is a threaded nut, screws into the fuel filter. The other side plugs into a plastic hose from the tank. I would have to figure out the terminations and how to fit everything together.
I replaced most of the brake and fuel lines on my last S-vehicle purchased. I strongly considered purchasing everything pre-fabricated in SS from Inline Tube. That company also has a very good reputation. After careful consideration, I purchased the Mastercool 72485-PRC Universal Hydraulic Flaring Tool Set; bulk NiCop tubing; and other mostly bulk materials from various sources instead. I still found it difficult to make good 3/8” PTC (Push-to-Connect) flares in NiCop. It was doable, though. All other flares were easy, including Saginaw O-ring / GM fuel line flares and 5/16” PTC flares. Even though the tool set was expensive at $324, that expense was almost entirely recovered on that job alone compared to purchasing the pre-fabricated lines. I did not enjoy fabricating all those lines. However, I suspect I will appreciate having the improved fabrication skills and tools in the future. Winter road salt is rough on vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The AFT lines were very easy, The Rigid Part of the Lines "Snap" right into the Holders that are attached to the frame, the Flexible part of the Lines (at the Fuel Pump Fittings) are Braided Stainless Steel and have all of the correct o-rings already installed. The Only thing wrong is the Filter they supplied was loosely installed backwards so make sure you check the arrow on the filter! The Fwd Lines were more difficult due to the routing over the transmission. I am very Happy with the decision to use them. It's expensive to Other Options But Better than having a Fuel Leak!
Good Luck
Thanks for the feedback. I have ordered the pre-made lines. I'll find out how they fit (fingers crossed.)

The Mastercool 72485 flairing kit looks like the same tool used by the South-Main guy in the video linked by Rimara (#12). Looks nice. But the cost, plus other components will add up. I'm feeling like going the lazy route and getting the pre-made lines.

I'll check back in a week or so, and update.
 

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1995 S10 2.2 liter 5 Speed 2wd RCSB
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Yes, Let Us Know.
IIRC it took a couple of weeks to get the lines, But then again, Covid was ruining alot of business.
I think everyone here would love the feedback.
Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes, Let Us Know.
IIRC it took a couple of weeks to get the lines, But then again, Covid was ruining alot of business.
I think everyone here would love the feedback.
Good Luck
I did receive the fuel lines, last week. They are an exact fit. Also came with a filter. I was worried there might not be enough room to fit the new lines in between the frame and the cab. But this was not a problem. It just took a little wiggling around to get the new lines in place.

I lifted the bed up, dump-truck style, but kept the rear bumper attached. The bed rested on the bumper and some 6" wood blocks I placed between the bed and frame. This allowed just enough access to disconnect old lines and install the new lines. Also jacked up the left side of the truck to work underneath.

One issue that had me stuck, was the old lines got rusted at the ends. The end of the metal lines plug into plastic quick-connect hoses. Rust builds up, in between the metal and plastic connector. Rust expands and locks the old metal line to the plastic connector.

I cleaned out as much rust and dirt as possible from the plastic quick-connects, using dental picks, etc. Cut the old metal line and removed the plastic hoses from the fuel tank. The end of the old metal line was still stuck to the plastic connector. I found depressing the plastic locking tabs and then rotating the metal line while pulling out, is what finally freed the metal line from plastic connector. As the metal line was freed, a yellow O-ring popped out (don't lose it!!) There is also a black, plastic, guide/sleeve/retainer thing that remained stuck to the end of the metal line. The black sleeve is stuck by rust that grew under it.

If the plastic lines are being reused, these small parts needed to be salvaged. I soaked the old line ends overnight in navel jelly. That removed visible rust, but couldn't penetrate between the plastic sleeve and metal line. This is like an interference fit. Hard to describe, but basically, like how to remove/install a bearing from a shaft, except a small plastic ring instead of a bearing. I don't have a press, but instead used a hammer (carefully.) I could post more detail about this if anyone wants.

Its easiest if the small parts are then installed back to the plastic quick-connect fittings. Yellow O-ring goes in first. The black plastic sleeve goes in last. The plastic sleeve is designed to snap in place and takes some force to insert. I used the blunt end of a drill bit to press the sleeve back into the plastic fitting. The drill bit had the same diameter as the plastic sleeve.

OK, post is getting long. Overall, I think installing pre-made, metal lines is straight forward. It has the advantage of not buying expensive tools or trying to cobble together something with compression fittings. Only thing was, I didn't expect the metal lines to be fused to the plastic quick-connect fittings. (not so quick in my case.) I think these complications add to the argument in favor of ripping it all out and replace the lines from end-to-end, with nylon or whatever is most convenient.

One more related thing to mention. The EVAP line runs parallel to the fuel lines. A few years ago, I was getting engine code P0440, frequently. Finally tracked it down to... guess what? Rusted out EVAP line. Back then, I by-passed the rusted EVAP line with rubber fuel hose. 5/16" ID. I think using rubber fuel hose on EVAP line is OK, it is mostly just air under moderate vacuum.
 

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Thank you for the update. A photo(s) of the PTC parts would have been much more helpful than a lot of words. Except for the retaining clips, I did not realize these fuel line PTC fittings had other “removable” parts. Ideally, I do not believe that o-ring and sleeve are designed to be removed from the fitting, as they do not even come as separate service parts in the Dorman 800-300 Nylon Fuel Line Repair Kit. I keep a few, spare 5/16” and 3/8” GM Fuel Retaining Clips on hand as they sometimes break. The Dorman 800-016 Kit is a fine source.

I found a photo of the sleeve, provided below.

Material property Gas Electric blue Cable Metal
 

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1995 S10 2.2 liter 5 Speed 2wd RCSB
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Awesome Electronic! I'm Glad you got it worked out! It's always an adventure isn't it? I replaced the fuel lines all the way to the engine, I just wanted to be sure everything was OK.
Thanks for Updating here, It might Help people for a long time!
 

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I just read this post. I had no idea northern trucks had such rust problems.
I replaced the fuel lines when the body was off and just a rolling chassis. I didnt have the evap system nailed down during the line install. So, today, im taking ole mater to a shop so he can terminate both ends at evap can.
Wheel Plant Tire Motor vehicle Automotive tire

Southern single post lift in the background
 

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1995 S10 2.2 liter 5 Speed 2wd RCSB
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I had no idea northern trucks had such rust problems.
My 95 is from South Carolina, The return had a very small pinhole in the steel, and the Flexible(Rubber) pressure line had split so I was leaking fuel like crazy right under the drivers door.
I am from NY and can tell you stories about "Hearing" vehicles Rotting away! LOL, I have a 2002 Silverado that was my Dads, It has 154k miles on it and has had body work and a respray paint job, It's almost time to change the Passenger side rocker panel, Paint has "Bubbles".
Love your Tow Truck! get-r-done!
 
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