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1997 S10 5.3L
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I own and operate a transmission shop in central Texas and have been a gear train specialist for 20 years. I owe this forum and community a great deal as I pretty much built my hot rod from information I found here posted by kind souls who did it first and shared... So, if you have any gear train or electrical questions, ask away. I will answer to the best of my ability, because you guys are cool.
 

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I'll go first. :)

1. Any real reason to run a catch tank on a transmission? I've only ever really seen then puke fluid when overfilled and on a dyno.

2. Is it necessary to actively check line pressure? Or is it the sort of thing that gets checked once and that's it? For what it's worth, I've never checked it in my TH400. :whistle:

Shame you aren't local to me as I was thinking of beefing up my trans at the end of the season; hopefully get my setup in the 5s.

Thanks in advance!
 

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1997 S10 5.3L
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll go first. :)

1. Any real reason to run a catch tank on a transmission? I've only ever really seen then puke fluid when overfilled and on a dyno.

2. Is it necessary to actively check line pressure? Or is it the sort of thing that gets checked once and that's it? For what it's worth, I've never checked it in my TH400. :whistle:

Shame you aren't local to me as I was thinking of beefing up my trans at the end of the season; hopefully get my setup in the 5s.

Thanks in advance!
Catch cans are good to have at the track. Sometimes high stall converters pushed to their limits can force fluid to vent (due to thrust pushing fluid back into the case or even flashing the fluid) and people get bent when you drop tranny fluid on the strip. So for that scenario it's a good idea. I usually only see this with 3500+ stall speeds behind high hp and rpm... or overfilling. Lol! Checking line pressure is more of a diagnostic thing or just satisfying a curiosity. If something is exhibiting a problem or if I am experimenting with a PR mod I might check it. I watch it on a trans dyno simply because you can't feel the shifts on it. When a trans goes straight into a vehicle I just test drive it. Pressure testing is a good for finding faulty EPC solenoids, but again, that's to find a problem.
 

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hello, i have an opportunity to get a 2001 v4 s10 if I can change the timing chain. the good news is I have changed my own oil a few times in the past on my honda civic i drove from 2001-2007. good wasn't the right word but I just mean to say I am determined and not totally green. i have a few questions and most likely will have more. before I go any further does this fit in your area of expertise?
 

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:rolleyes:
 

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I own and operate a transmission shop in central Texas and have been a gear train specialist for 20 years. I owe this forum and community a great deal as I pretty much built my hot rod from information I found here posted by kind souls who did it first and shared... So, if you have any gear train or electrical questions, ask away. I will answer to the best of my ability, because you guys are cool.
Your a transmission specialist maybe you can point me in the direction of a engine specialist
 

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1997 S10 5.3L
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
hello, i have an opportunity to get a 2001 v4 s10 if I can change the timing chain. the good news is I have changed my own oil a few times in the past on my honda civic i drove from 2001-2007. good wasn't the right word but I just mean to say I am determined and not totally green. i have a few questions and most likely will have more. before I go any further does this fit in your area of expertise?
I'm really not much of an engine guy aside from LS stuff. I don't think i would be much help on this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Your a transmission specialist maybe you can point me in the direction of a engine specialist
I know many here in central Texas, but none i could refer you to on this forum. Look around some of the engine threads or search your question and I'm sure you'd find someone.
 

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Alright, So I've got a 2000 4x4 Sonoma with a 4 speed auto. Its been a good truck for the couple years I've owned it, But when I was changing the T-case fluid and it was about a quart over the fill plug... I know its either the output seal for the transmission or the input seal on the transfer case. What parts do I need to fix the leak, is there a gasket between the T-case and tranny, any other parts/seals I should know about. Finally do you got any other tips on how I should go about this. Any help is appreciated.
 

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Alright, So I've got a 2000 4x4 Sonoma with a 4 speed auto. Its been a good truck for the couple years I've owned it, But when I was changing the T-case fluid and it was about a quart over the fill plug... I know its either the output seal for the transmission or the input seal on the transfer case. What parts do I need to fix the leak, is there a gasket between the T-case and tranny, any other parts/seals I should know about. Finally do you got any other tips on how I should go about this. Any help is appreciated.
Its the rear seal on the transmission that is bad you definitely need to fix it. There is also a gasket that goes between the case and transmission

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
There is no rear seal on the transmission. It's the front seal of the transfer case. You'll need the seal, silicone, fluid, and tools. Remove the t-case. There will be a 4 bolt flange that houses the front seal. Remove it and knock the seal out with a hammer and flathead screwdriver. Drive the new seal in with your hammer abs something flat. Clean the silicone off of both surfaces and clean with brake clean. Apply a thin layer of silicone to the matting surface of the flange. Note that there is a relief in the flange that needs to line up with a small hole by the input shaft. Bolt it back on, reinstall it, and fill it up. Use silicone on the mains surfaces if the t-case to extension housing of the trans. If it's a t-case model without the removable flange, use a seal puller or a screw to get there old seal out, drive the new one in gently.
 
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