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What y'all watchin HOES!?
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the Big Red Ridepro E setup and have never really got the gausges to give true readings. I spoke with a ART rep at their booth at the Good Guys show in Pleasanton last week and he said they have a newer style now, that works better, and also a bracket that grounds them better. I guess the way the instructions told you to ground it before has it run through the alluminum block valve, which doesn't work too well.

My question is to any ART reps that may be listening. Is there a way to send the units I have back, and get the new ones, and possibly the brackets needed to ground the sensors correctly?
 

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i need a pics of the units too.. my display says my bags are at 150 psi dunno is that the right readings..thanks

who ever
 

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both of those sound like grounding issues and either the senders are not grounding out well or they are picking up static from another electronic device like the compressor or a stereo equipment.
 

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I know its not the same product but I have the dakota digital ones...and I ground them all to one ground. Its funny cause when the compressors kick on they change a small amount and when they go off they go back to another reading. Tony....how would you reccomend we ground sending units to properly give us good readings??
 

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What y'all watchin HOES!?
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
both of those sound like grounding issues and either the senders are not grounding out well or they are picking up static from another electronic device like the compressor or a stereo equipment.
Well, I have grounded each unit exactly as specified in the manual, and by the tech support guys phone calls. And ran the ground wire straight to the negative post of the battery, and still I get crappy readings. Is there not a bracket that is out now that allows the unit to be properly grounded because it mounts the unit to the frame via bracketry intead of mounted directly on the valve block, which is aluminum, and does not conduct electricity as well?
 

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well tony ...what is the reading supose to be when fully aired up?? and my ground is by my deck, my ground is on the firewall...


thanks
 

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by saying bad ground it is not necessarily saying that the ground is insufficient....... think of it in this light, those senders are reading in OHMs ( resistance ) and if there is another high out put device near them or grounded near them it can screw up the signal that the senders are actually sending the ECU. In an ideal situation, I prefer to ground the sending unit panel and the ECU in the same location on the body or chassis and then I like to run the compressor / audio grounds straight back to the battery. That way, your battery is the acting capacitor in the system and cancels out any "noise" before it reaches the sending units. If you sender panel is mounted to the frame near your compressor, I would also take and rubber isolate the panel just to ensure that you are not getting any feedback.
 

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What y'all watchin HOES!?
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ok..... don't mean to be nitpicky, but I want to make sure I got this correct...... The ideal way to ground is to Run ground wires for all 4 sending units, and the ECU to the same location and ground them on the frame or body, (preferably frame) and this will most likely remove any interference? I will try this if it will allow my gauges to work properly.
I would also take and rubber isolate the panel just to ensure that you are not getting any feedback.
I am guessing by sender panel you mean..... the ECU? because I've never heard of a sender panel. My ECU is mounted in the glove box, each valve block is mounted individually on diff parts of the frame, and all 5 ground wires go straight to the battery. To clerify.

P.s. - Thanks for taking the time to help us out on this Tony, I know plenty of people have or will have this problem, because so many people use the Ride pro E system. And this should help them out too. :tup: thanks again.
 

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He wants you to ground all the senders and ECU at the same location so there is no diffrence in resistance. When there is a diff then it throws off the senders accuracy and how they perform well. I have MY DDG senders and unit all grounded to one point on the frame and my compresssors to another. I may change the grounds for the comps so it doesnt allow a ground loop or interference.
 

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What y'all watchin HOES!?
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I do have them all grounded in the same place, on the neg battery terminal. I would imagine this creates a smoother flow of current, and less resistance/interference than mounting them on the frame, but I don't know with 100% certainty
 

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What y'all watchin HOES!?
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
well, are you talking about fully aired up, all laid out? what size engine do you have, type of bag etc. It's not the same with every setup....
 

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rear...Roadgrater,f900 bags
front...shockwaves

enigine 2.2l

iam just wanting to know when fully air up iam reading 150psi right now and iam not sure if thats the right reading..maybe i have a bad grond?? dunno let me know

thanks
 

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I'll see if I can't help Tony out on this one. My name is Britt and I helped design the RideProE unit.
(Most of the time you can find me helping in the electrical section giving advice on SPAL shaved door kits and the like. The addition of the Air Ride section gives me the oportunity to help my fellow dime enthusists
on electronics I helped design.)

"What should my gauge read?"-This is dependent upon what you run for pressure in your system. The gauge sensors (whether silver or gold) are rated up to 150psi. (VDO part number 360 004, if you want to look up the specs) However, the control unit can read up to 186psi (due to the proof pressure of the sensor, we can actually read over 150 psi.)
If you are using the 135psi pressure switch supplied by ART, your compressor will turn on at 135psi, and off at 150psi. Therefore, if you have a full supply of air, and you raise the truck to full extension, you should see near 150 psi on the control panel.
(my '02 extended cab s-10 was used for most of the development work on the RideProE and the new, not-yet-released LevelProE. It rides at 105-110 front and 60-70 in the rear.)

"Why doesn't my RideProE read pressure correctly? Why doesn't my RideProE auto level correctly? Ect."- This is due to the type of sensor used to measure air pressure. When we built the RideProE the only pressure transducer available in the quantity required was the VDO sensor (normally used for measuring oil pressure. But liquid and air have properties similar enough for use in this type of system.)
The sensor is a resistive type. What we didn't expect was the interference from external sources such as compressor, large stereo systems, etc. These systems create "noise" (electronic noise). What happens is, when the pump kicks on for example, it draws a large amount of power from the electrical system and actually changes the ground plane. Since the sensors use the ground plane as a constant, a change in the ground plane changes the output of the sensor.
To add to the problem, the grounding of the sensor was never very good. The sensor housing is steel; the fitting they connect to is brass; the plate that holds all the sensors is stainless steel; then the plate is connected to anything from body sheetmetal, to the chassis, to plywood (as is the case in many hot rods.)

The best fix is to solder a male spade connector to the sensor housing. Create a harness with female spade connectors that ties all the sensors together and run this ground wire directly to the ground of the RideProE, then directly to the ground of the battery. Then ground the compressor, stereo, amps, ect. directly to the frame as far away from the battery ground as possible. This allows the chassis to "filter" the noise from the electrical system.

The proper way to solve this issue is to use a variable voltage pressure sensor that is supplied power and ground from the controller. This way we can isolate everything to the controller. For the new LevelProE we developed our own variable voltage air pressure sensors. (as the only units available on the market are intended for industrial automation and cost $250 each.) We also gave the contoller the abilty to read any 0-5VDC variable voltage displacement sensor for accuracy. (My dime will return to within 1/8-inch of ride height each and every time.) You can use anything from rotary Hall Effect sensors (which are supplied by ART and are easily, and inexpensively available) to string pots, to a laser level system that runs $4500 for four sensors!

If you have any questions, or need help on the RideProE or any electronics, just drop me an e-mail at [email protected] and put something about s-10's or Air Ride in the subject line (otherwise my spam filter will place you in junk mail, and I will never see your message.)

Peace,

-Britt-
 

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What y'all watchin HOES!?
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Awesome info there Britt! I will no doubt be sending you an E-mail soon. Hope to see you around the ART section more. Thanks again.
 
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