S-10 Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
INNOVATIVE FABRICATIONS
Joined
·
2,816 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Alright. Heres the deal. I bought a parts truck with what I was told has a small block Chevy 350. Supposedly the engine and tranny have only 3,500 miles on it. The previous owner gave me all the recipts for the tranny, so I know it's new. He also gave me recipts for the engine mods (intake, carb, cam, etc.) but doesn't have any receipt's for the engine work itself. So, last night I decided to tear down the engine to verify that it is all new inside. Now the fun begins. First off, I want to make sure that this engine is a 350 and not a 305 or anything. So I start looking on the side of the block and I can't find any "350" markings anywhere.
So question #1 is...how else can I tell if this engine is a 350? The heads are staying on so I can't check the bore size.

Now, I'm taking off the harmonic balancer and all is well until the balancer comes off and I see that where the end of the puller was turning, happened to be at the crank end. The puller has a cone shaped end on it and when I was cranking down on it, it bored out the end of the crank. It basically tapered the inside of the end of the crank where the threads are. It only did so about 1/8" in but still, FAWK!!! is all that I could say.

So question #2 is...I know the machine shop balances the crankshaft when doing the machine work, so is removing some material going to throw the entire crank out of whack or will the balancer make up for little things like that or ?

After dealing with that, I take off the timing cover to find a dual timing chain setup. I'm thinking to myself, "Cool, I think stock motors from the factory come with single timing chain setups so obviously someone has at least been into the engine this far." As I look in between the gap of the bottom of the timing chain and the oil pan, I see something shiny. I grab some needle nose pliers and pull out of the oil pan one of the three tiny oil galley plugs. Now, it was sitting inside the oil pan but on the upper part of the pan which I thought was odd. Almost like it just feel out when I was pulling the engine or when I put it on the stand. I also inspected the plug and it does not look beat up at all like one would after getting tossed around from the crank.

So question #3 is...how do I check to make sure that the valvetrain on the left side of the engine is alright? (It was the left galley plug that feel out)

I need to know answers to these questions before I begin the assembly (which I was hoping to do tomorrow on New Year's Day) Thanks.
 

·
Say lowered d
Joined
·
1,349 Posts
Answer #1) You can take the block casting # located on the passenger side where the tranny bolts up to the block and go to www.mortec.com and run the # to see what motor size is. You said that you were going to tear it down to make sure everything was new though I thought.

Answer #2) When the machine shop balances the crank, they are going to need to remove and add metal to balance it anyway, so you wont need to worry. The "balancer" is actually a harmonic dampner. Only on a 400 would it be a balancer.

Answer #3) The only way you will be able to tell if everything is good to go, is to pull it all apart. Heck, a Fel-Pro KS2600 complete gasket set is 31.99. That's CHEAP piece of mind. You dont want to cobble it together then find out that you need to take it all back out and rebuild it because you didnt tear it apart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
What do you guys think about the plug falling out. If it falls out from getting beat around during removal how was it supposed to stay put with oil pressure behind it? Don't want to scare you man, I'm just curious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
All you can do with the plug is take a small chisel and stake the edges so it can't fall out.The alternative is to drill and tap it for a pipe plug.But of course this can't be done with out a complete tear down.

As for your question about wear on the left side valve train.Look for any blueing caused by heat if there was no oil there would have been plenty of heat.
 

·
Say lowered d
Joined
·
1,349 Posts
Yeah, the machine shop should have done that. I always check those when I get blocks back. Usually they have 3 little nicks in each one.
 

·
INNOVATIVE FABRICATIONS
Joined
·
2,816 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Ok. Thanks for the replies everyone. So, when I get home, I'll run the number on the block to be sure it is a 350 (thanks loweredd). I know that the "balancer" is actually a harmonic dampener but I didn't know how much material you could remove from the crank before the dampener couldn't't dampen anymore and cause catastrophic results. It sounds like it should be fine though. Finally, I have a complete Fel Pro gasket kit. I just didn't want to take off the heads. With the oil galley plug removed, the only damage it could cause would be up in the valve train, correct? If so, then I just need to take the valve train off and inspect it, right? Also, FYI to all, I was physically moving each rocker arm by hand to see how tight they were and I noticed that the very first rocker arm (on the passenger side) closest to the front of the engine was way loose. Like, "take a look at me, I am looser than a hooker on the corner of Hollywood and Vine on a Saturday night" kinda loose. Could that oil galley plug have anything to do with that?
 

·
Say lowered d
Joined
·
1,349 Posts
The only way it could be that loose (other than bad adjustment) would be if the rocker stud is pulling out of the head, like with a VERY stiff valve spring.
 

·
INNOVATIVE FABRICATIONS
Joined
·
2,816 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
**UPDATE**

Alright. I went ahead and took out all the valvetrain on the engine. All of the parts on the left side of the engine have severe bluing (sp) marks from heat.:cuss: Not only that but remember that first rocker arm that was extremely loose? I found out why. When I took off all of the valvetrain, I looked at the top of the valve that was under that rocker arm and there is SEVERE wear and tear on top of that valve. My guess from having no oil being pumped up there. So.....I know that I need to take off the heads (well at least the left one) so that I can change out that valve. But first, a few questions for the experts.

Question #1: I have never rebuilt a head before. I know whats invloved, but have never done it. I don't want to take it to a shop cause thats time and $$$$$ that I don't want to spend. Plus I won't know how to do it cause the shop did it. How hard is it and what tools do I need to completely strip and assemble the heads?

Question #2: I know that I need to replace at least that one valve that got totalled. Should I replace the rest of them on the left side just to play it safe or ?

Question #3: I am going to replace EVERY lifter, rocker arm and pushrod in the engine, but do I need to replace the valve springs as well or do they really not get damaged, just worn out over time?

Also FYI, I ran the block numbers and the head numbers. Turns out the block is a two bolt main anywhere from 1968-1980. It also is a 350. The heads came back as being from 1974-1980. So I am guessing that the engine came as a package from a camaro (what the previous owner thought) anywhere from 1974-1980. So that narrows down some info. Anyway, thanks again with any help you guys can provide. I am not going to move forward until I hear back from some of you.
 

·
footbraker
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
Spend the money and take both heads to a machine shop. And better to buy cam, lifters, and springs together. What was the casting number on those heads? I'd guess they're prolly 882.
 

·
INNOVATIVE FABRICATIONS
Joined
·
2,816 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the reply. Why do you say take them to a machine shop though? And ya, the heads are 882's. Is that good, bad or standard?
 

·
footbraker
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
I got my 882 heads rebuilt for $250. Just say machine shop cuz they know what to do and it's not that expensive. 882's a decent iron head. They're not so good for high lift cams (over .500) and high rpm's (I shift mine at 5200 - can rev it to 6000 without changing ET's).If you install bigger valves then they need work on the intake ports. Use around a 268 adv. cam. Call comp cams to be sure.
 

·
INNOVATIVE FABRICATIONS
Joined
·
2,816 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the reply. If I do take the heads to a machine shop, do I want them to change out all the valves or just the one that is bad? Also, what about the valve springs? Keep the current or replace those also? Thanks.:dunno:
 

·
footbraker
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
I'd say just replace the bad valve(s). Are you planning on a new cam? If so just buy a kit with cam, lifters, and springs.
I'd be skeptical of any parts that were starved for oil or overheated.
 

·
INNOVATIVE FABRICATIONS
Joined
·
2,816 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I wasn't going to get another cam but maybe I should look into it. I guess this inexpensive build up is going nothing but :thumbdown
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top