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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an 84 s10 blazer 2wd auto, with a 3.4l swap. A couple of months ago I had a nasty transmission fluid leak, so I filled it up with some leak stop and 2 quarts of auto tranny fluid (it was really low!). That leak stopped for about 2 weeks, and now there's a new leak, but it's not back by the transmission. It's just under the fan, pulley/belts. It looks like it's coming from these two steel lines in the pic...are those transmission fluid lines?

The fluid still looks like red auto tranny fluid, and it's leaking probably a dozen drops everytime I park and shut it off.
 

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Awww..you ain't got shit!
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The lines are leaking. Where they are bound together they eventually rub a hole in each other from the vibration. Cut out the offending section and replace it with a piece of rubber tranmsission hose. Make sure it is reinforced. Take a dremel or a file and get the ends smooth...you don't want any burrs eating at the rubber. If you don't put at least two hose clamps on either side, you will be sorry (and walking when it blows off). Trust me I know. Mine has three on each side!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So a hose with 2-3 very tight clamps on each side should hold the fluid pressure? What's the difference between say, fuel hose and transmission hose?

I'll have to find where it's leaking somehow beneath all that mess. Maybe spray it off with some degreaser first to see where it originates. Thanks.
 

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Yeah, get it clean, and it should be obvious. There are some clamps that hold the lines together. Take them off and throw them away. Spread the lines a little so they don't touch. I'd inspect the lines wherever they touch. If it's thin in one spot, it's likely thin wherever those lines meet and likely to start leaking in that spot sooner or later. Use a socket or a nut driver to tighten the clamps. Screwdrivers won't get them tight enough.

I think the tranny hose is higher pressure rated. Anyone? It's not expensive. I run some long lengths on mine without issue.

Two clamps will hold it, but why take a chance? Put 4 on it if you wanna be extra anal, but yeah it will hold. Rubber hose is factory on a lot of applicatons, but not these trucks.

It is very upleasant when they blow off. Not only are you about to walk, it sprays it all over the exhaust and you'll smell it for the next month. Plus it will smoke, and you will think it's leaking again and make you paranoid.

Lastly...that stuff is expensive! It can pump about 2-3 quarts out before you can grab the key to shut it down.
 

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yes those are transmission fluid lines.they run into the radiator for cooling.i would also suggest making sure that none of that fluid got on your belts. they tend to fly off after that and create more havoc. seen a belt fly off on a E350 diesal van cause of ATF and smacked the power steering pump and lines and catch on fire. luckily it burned to the ground and i didnt have to fix it :)
 

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I've had this happen to me twice. Once in my 84 truck, which was bad because I was already late to work and worse, I had to get a wrecker because I couldn't leave it where it was. The second time was in my Buick LeSabre. I should have had some warning. I had just replaced one of the coolant lines (hard metal) and I forgot to hook the alternator pigtail back up. Well, it quit on my wife on her way to work when the battery went dead. When I got there I noticed the transmission was slipping. I went and got a couple of quarts. I was confused to say the least. Well, I drove it 20 miles back home, and 20 miles back to class that night. Then on the way home the line, which in this case was made more like a power steering hose with crimped metal ends on high pressure hose, blows apart at the crimp, and it sprayed all over the manifold. Lets just say there was a LOT of smoke and I shut it down. Luckily for me, a guy that just drives around and helps people with their cars for a few bucks drives by and pulls over. Fortunately, on this hose the fix is cutting the crimped part off with a hacksaw and pushing it back into the hose. I hated I only had 10 bucks to give the guy, but that's all I had. $10 for 10 minutes is $60 an hour, so I don't guess he could bitch.

Apparently this is a common point of failure since out of four joints on mine two had already been repaired...and they were all like this at the junkyard. I finally found a good one, but decided later not to use it because it freaked me out that it would fail too....So I just cut the remaining one on mine, ground off the burrs and put a total of 12 clamps on the 4 ends with new hose. No more problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What a crappy deal, I had no idea these were such common failure points. I better get on it asap before I have a breakdown like you guys have experienced! Thanks for the help!
 
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