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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just went to the junkyard and pulled 4 spare wheels off of blazers/s10s. 4 cost $120. Bought $15 of paint, primer, and clear coat. Gonna clean em up, sand em down, primer, paint, and clear coat. Anyone done anything similar and care to post final results?
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Rim Paint
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Rim Paint
 

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2003 Sonoma SLS ext. cab 4.3L / 4x4
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The last time I repainted a set of wheels, I spent a hell of a lot more than $15/ wheel for sand paper, primer, paint, and clear coat. A single rattle can of primer or paint will run $7- $8. Rotsa ruck with a $15 expenditure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The last time I repainted a set of wheels, I spent a hell of a lot more than $15/ wheel for sand paper, primer, paint, and clear coat. A single rattle can of primer or paint will run $7- $8. Rotsa ruck with a $15 expenditure.
Each can was only $5 at home depot, but I might need some more. One can of each should be enough for all 4 wheels though
 

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2003 Sonoma SLS ext. cab 4.3L / 4x4
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Each can was only $5 at home depot, but I might need some more. One can of each should be enough for all 4 wheels though
You will likely be surprised how far one can won't go. When I painted my set, I did the entire wheel (all surfaces), and there is no way one can will provide an adequate and uniform paint film coverage and finish, unless you are considering only doing the outside facing surface. Are you planning on using lacquer or enamel? Just remember that the real work in a paint job is in the prep work and a clean uncontaminated surface to start with. Paint doesn't "hide" anything - it only accentuates any deficiencies (which should be corrected in the prep stage). Good luck.
 
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Dude, just clean them up the best you can and then paint them the best you can. They'll look a million times better than they do now no matter how you go about it. You may even learn a thing or two along the way. Aside from paint they look to be in decent shape.

So tired of see naysayers and unencouraging posts around here.
 

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2003 Sonoma SLS ext. cab 4.3L / 4x4
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Dude, just clean them up the best you can and then paint them the best you can. They'll look a million times better than they do now no matter how you go about it. You may even learn a thing or two along the way. Aside from paint they look to be in decent shape.

So tired of see naysayers and unencouraging posts around here.
Since I am currently the only respondent besides you, I am inferring your comments reference my posts. Their intent was/ is to convey my experience with my wheel painting and to offer a few tips, and not to be negative or discouraging - just information based the on the reality I encountered when doing my wheels.
 

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Those steelies will look good with body matching paint, some shiny center caps and trim rings. Did that to the cop wheels on my 9C1 Caprice 12 years ago and they still look good. I hated the black cop wheels and wanted to tone down the "Polizei" look.
To conserve the amount of Duplicolor needed I primed them in a similar colored primer. Tan in my case. But did use a lot of clear to prevent the usual Duplicolor fade. IIRC 4 coats of clear on each wheel. Spent an easy $50 12 years ago. That was before Duplicolor went to the tiny cans. Probably twice that today.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Is rust-o-leum a good brand to paint wheels? I bought gloss black paint, flat white primer and clear coat and I have a dremel tool that i will use to clean up the wheels some before using sandpaper to smooth it off.
 

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2003 Sonoma SLS ext. cab 4.3L / 4x4
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Is rust-o-leum a good brand to paint wheels? I bought gloss black paint, flat white primer and clear coat and I have a dremel tool that i will use to clean up the wheels some before using sandpaper to smooth it off.
Rust-o-leum is a paint that I have used successfully on all types of projects over the years. With a dark paint color, I prefer to use the sandable gray primer. Dremel makes a good product and I have put mine to use for multitudes of projects, however, it is a small handheld tool for smaller jobs. The tool 'scale factor' is way-y-y out of proportion for this application, not to mention you could likely burn it up trying to 'prep' a set of wheels, and most probably not make any meaningful progress. If you are going to use a power tool, I'd suggest using a full size drill (borrow, rent, or buy) and the implements of your choice (wire wheels, flap sander, etc.) followed up with finer grit hand sanding to remove deep scratches, and/ or feather out chipped areas. Or, since the wheels don't appear to be in too bad of shape, and if this is going to be a 'down & dirty' type of exercise, just skip the drill and clean the wheels really well and take your time with sandpaper. Also, remove the valve stems - it makes the job easier , better, and you'll get new ones anyway with the tire installation.
 

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Usually I use a wire wheel on a drill for the hard ones (steel), followed by vary grits of sandpaper by hand.

Most are painted with VHT wheel paint.
 

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2003 Sonoma SLS ext. cab 4.3L / 4x4
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Most are painted with VHT wheel paint.
Is that for use in conjunction with VHT tires? :) I've never used it (for wheels) and I've never had any issues with 'regular' paint on all of my wheel refinish projects. I use the VHT paint for brake and appropriate engine components.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Automotive tire Light Rim Auto part Gas

prepped them by washing them off with a hose then drying, then some carb cleaner, then some sand paper for the more mucky looking ones
 
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