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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well i have a 12in audiobahn sub, And a 760w Kenwood amp. The amp is bridgeable.
Anyways i know how you guys like visuals, and so do i, So i took pictures.
Anyways, Here is the sub with 4 places to put the wire.

The amp, With only one sub hooked up

Now, I would like to bridge it if it sounds good, So i know how to bridge the amp, But where do i put the wires at?
Thanks!
Anyways, When my amp is bridged, And my wires running to the subs are in the two in the middle, Their is no sound. But when i unbridge it, Their is sound but not loud at all.
 

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where did you get a pioneer/kenwood amp at? Anyways what model sub? How many voice coils and what impedance? What is your amp stable to?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry the amp is pioneer.
The amp is 380w x 1 RMS, 190w x 2 (2-ohm) RMS, 125w x 2 (4-ohm)
The sub- 1100W RMS / 2200W Peak Power Dual And 4 Ohm Voice Coils
I dont car how many ohms, But do i HAVE to run the sub by 4 ohms? Or can i run it by 1 ohm? Or will 4 ohms sound better than 1? Thanks!
 

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Droppedime08 said:
Sorry the amp is pioneer.
The amp is 380w x 1 RMS, 190w x 2 (2-ohm) RMS, 125w x 2 (4-ohm)
The sub- 1100W RMS / 2200W Peak Power Dual And 4 Ohm Voice Coils
I dont car how many ohms, But do i HAVE to run the sub by 4 ohms? Or can i run it by 1 ohm? Or will 4 ohms sound better than 1? Thanks!
I have bad news for you, your amp and subwoofer dont mesh very well. Let me explain. Your subwoofer is a dual 4ohm unit, which means you can either wire each 4ohm coil in parallel fr a single 2ohm load (parallel halves the impedance), or you can series the two 4ohm coils to get a single 8ohm load (series doubles the impedance). You didn't list the ohms rating for the amp at the 380x1 setting, but from the other specs I can tell its only stable to 4ohms mono (mono means X1) because its lowest setereo rating (X2) is 2ohms. Bridging an amplifier means its running at one channel rather than the two, but they work by wiring to one side of each of the 2 channels. An amp that is bridged sees half the impedance load to each channel. So wiring your amp to 2ohms mono as I described above would result in the amp seeing a 1ohm load to each channel, which the specs say it is not stable for.

You're gonna have to wire the sub to 8ohms mono or 4ohms stereo (one channel to each coil). I suggest 8ohms mono as it wont require summing the signal mono before the amplifier as wiring it in stereo would (you dont want stereo seperation going to each coil on the same speaker.... inefficient). This means you cannot wire that sub to the impedance rating that would maximize the amplifier's output (4ohms mono/2ohms stereo). Either get a different amp, a different sub, or live with getting only half the amp's maximum power.
 

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I have the same setup as you. This is how I did it @ 4 ohms bridged. I ran 2 wires from the positive terminal on the one channel two each each positive terminal on the sub. Then i ran two wires from the negetive terminal on the other channel of the amp to each negetive terminal on the sub. I its still 4 ohms and its bridged.
 

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91S104x4 said:
I have the same setup as you. This is how I did it @ 4 ohms bridged. I ran 2 wires from the positive terminal on the one channel two each each positive terminal on the sub. Then i ran two wires from the negetive terminal on the other channel of the amp to each negetive terminal on the sub. I its still 4 ohms and its bridged.
Umm...no. That paralleled the coils, which means you're bridged at 2 ohms. Not good for your amp. Really the only way to make it work is to get a second sub or bridge it at 8 ohms.
 

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just hook up each voice coil to each channel on the amp for 4 ohm stereo, if you wire both coils to it bridged that will be 2ohms mono. I think you will either pop alot of fuses or burn up your amp. My suggestion get an amp that will run 2ohms mono, or a good mono sub amp, go for around 800rms, should pump pretty good
 

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If you wire the amp in stereo, make sure the signal for each channel is the same. If you have each voice coil playing 2 different things, it could create alot of heat and possibly burn up your sub.
 

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91 S-10 Pickup 4x4
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wow, i know my amp is only stable @ 4homs bridged and ive been running like that for a year with no problems?
 

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91 S-10 Pickup 4x4
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Wait! I just saw the chart from kicker how to wire in parallel. Mines different here is how I have mine. In parallel, there are only two wires, Im using 4 wires all together but still bridged.
 

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Still parallel, your way just uses more wire. If your gain is kept down and you don't really push it too hard it'll probably be fine, but if you drive the hell out of the amp, it will most likely burn up or go into protect mode.
 

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91S104x4 said:
I have the same setup as you. This is how I did it @ 4 ohms bridged. I ran 2 wires from the positive terminal on the one channel two each each positive terminal on the sub. Then i ran two wires from the negetive terminal on the other channel of the amp to each negetive terminal on the sub. I its still 4 ohms and its bridged.
Like someone else said, that is not 4ohms mono. It is physically impossible to wire a 4ohm DVC speaker into a 4ohm mono load.

skinnyg said:
just hook up each voice coil to each channel on the amp for 4 ohm stereo, if you wire both coils to it bridged that will be 2ohms mono. I think you will either pop alot of fuses or burn up your amp. My suggestion get an amp that will run 2ohms mono, or a good mono sub amp, go for around 800rms, should pump pretty good
Wiring each coil to each channel, giving the amp a 4ohm stereo load would result in exactly the same output as simply wiring the coils in series to an 8ohm mono load. In other words, wiring in this method will result in no benefit over 8ohm mono, but will require more caution in the form of summing the signal mono before the amplification stage. It would be simpler and less risky to just wire it in series to an 8ohm mono load.
 

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PSYKO_Inc said:
Still parallel, your way just uses more wire. If your gain is kept down and you don't really push it too hard it'll probably be fine, but if you drive the hell out of the amp, it will most likely burn up or go into protect mode.
I still think my way is safe becasue using 2 wires at each channel is a way to add resistence to the system. Me and my friend have both ran subs wired just like this for quite sometime and we both know our amps arent stable at 2ohms bridged. We both crank em up and we have absolutly no problems. This how even tell my friends to wire theres and no problems yet from them. Foer some reason it works quite well.
 

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91S104x4 said:
I still think my way is safe becasue using 2 wires at each channel is a way to add resistence to the system. Me and my friend have both ran subs wired just like this for quite sometime and we both know our amps arent stable at 2ohms bridged. We both crank em up and we have absolutly no problems. This how even tell my friends to wire theres and no problems yet from them. Foer some reason it works quite well.
Adding twice the copper (more wires) for the electrons to flow through will decrease resistance, not add to it. Its like running one larger wire.

If you really are running that amp in that wiring configuration, and pushing it hard at all, then obviously the amp is stable below its advertised minimum impedance (which does happen from time to time). Consider yourself lucky. ;)
 
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