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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've been getting many questions and requests about camshafts option for these motors, so I figured why not make a guide for them. Some of the information has been posted in other threads, and collected here for simplicity.

Let me start here:

Stock Camshaft Specs

The '94-'95 cam doesn't have the notch for the cam position sensor, the '96-'97 cam does. Both cams are the same profile:
Duration @ 0.050": 188*Int./188*Exh.
Intake Centerline: 109* ATDC
Lobe Separation Angle: 114*
Lobe lift: 0.288"/0.288"
Lift @ valve: 0.432"/0.432" (with stock pivot ball stamped steel rocker arms, 1.5:1 ratio and guide plates)
All the "98 and later cams had the cam position sensor notch and have the following profile:
Duration @ 0.050": 185*/185*
Intake Centerline: 108* ATDC
Lobe Separation Angle: 112*
Lobe Lift: 0.263"/0.263"
Lift @ Valve: 0.421"/0.421" (with cast steel needle bearing fulcrum, self-aligning rocker arms with a nominal 1.6:1 ratio. Some have been checked to an actual 1.54:1 ratio)
The difference between the two profiles is minimal, i.e., not really worth the effort to switch between the to in stock form.​

The three additional degrees of duration and on degree later opening on the first cam gives it a very slight advantage in the mid to upper RPMs of it's operating range, but peak torque and horsepower are slightly negated by the wider lobe separation angle (LSA). The wider LSA also gives the motor a slightly smoother idle, slightly higher vacuum and a broader flatter torque curve, but at a loss of response. The motors that had these cams had a programed rev limiter of 6250 RPMs.​

On the second profile, the shorter duration and earlier opening of the intake , build the low end torque, as does the higher rate of valve opening of the 1.6:1 rocker arms. The tighter LSA created more peak torque and horsepower, at the expense of a slightly tighter operating range. This did make these motors slightly more responsive. With the smaller valve springs and the cam profile, the rev limiter on these motors was lowered slightly to 6000 RPMs.​

There has been some confusion in the past, about the timing notch, the timing notch (on the cams that had them) did not change between the cams designs. The timing notch that changed (10* difference) was on the cranckshafts, between the '97 & older model years and the '98 & later models.​
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Arrg! Let me try this again!

All descriptions of cam characteristics are based upon use in a stock motor. All descriptions are theoretical and are based upon my experiences and on information produced from Desktop Dyno. I will not give the actual number produced by this software, only the gains projected. The reasons are too many to list and there are too many variables that can affect the out come of the results. It took years of work just to get the baseline information programed correctly.

Any other modifications, such as increased compression, porting and polishing, bigger valves, bigger throttle body and/or header/exhaust will affect where the gains occur.

Tuning (HP Tuners or EFI Live) will maximize the gains made with any modification made to a computer controlled motor. The more aggressive the cam, the more likely the need for computer modifications to get the motor to idle correctly and keep it from thinking you have a misfire.

New Aftermarket Cams

Import Performance Parts (IPP): They are the only company that I have seen making new camshafts other than stock replacements. Their listing for these cams is under Chevy Cavalier, which has the exact same motor (except the intake manifold and some freeze plugs) as the S trucks. They describe their cams "billet" cores, but are actually a hardened cast steel core. This is more than sufficient for all but the most radical mechanical roller cams, so don't fret this, unless you plan on the most radical of roller cams for your motor. (If you're going this far a true billet cam at $700+ is what you would need!) There is also some mathematical errors on the lift at valve figures, just do your own math by multiplying the "Cam Lift" by the ratio of the rocker arms you are using (i.e., 1.5 or 1.6). All my figures are using the 1.6:1 ratio rocker arms.

Here is the page from their web site: http://www.importperformanceparts.net/imports/ippwebcam-cavalier2.html

The following specs for the cams are based on an intake centerline of 108*. The true C/L needs to be read with a degree wheel. If the true C/L is different the power band will adjust up or down the rpm range depending upon whether the cam is advanced (lower rpm) or retarded (higher rpm). The difference is typically 50 rpm per degree, but this can vary also.

Stage 1: "Good idle for daily use. Improved low to mid range torque. Use stock springs and retainers. Stock compression OK, but will work better with increased compression."
Duration @ 0.050": 202*Int./208*Exh.
Lobe Separation Angle: 112*
Lobe lift: 0.274"/0.284"
Lift @ valve: .438"/.454"
The idle characteristics should be close to stock with maybe a loss of 1" or 2" of vacuum. Should not pose any problems with the PCM. The torque peak occurred between 3000 and 3500 rpm, with a gain of about 12 lbs/ft. The peak horsepower occurred at 5000 rpm and it gained about 5 hp. The peak may actually be 100 to 200 rpm lower. This would be a good RV cam or towing cam, while gains are made, but at lower rpms than stock and are milder than the other profiles. Increased compression helps, but isn't needed.

Stage 2: "Good idle, more duration (keeps valves open longer), strong pulling cam for improved mid and upper end power. Stock springs & retainers can be used with stock compression, however the cam needs more compression (10-1, 10.5-1), to make more HP (works well for oval track with high compression)."
Duration @ 0.050": 208*Int./212*Exh.
Lobe Separation Angle: 112*
Lobe lift: 0.284"/0.293"
Lift @ valve: .454"/.469"
This cam will have a slight lope to it. You should lose about 2 to 4" of vacuum. It will probably trip the CEL/SES light, if you sit warmed up at idle for about a minute or more. The peak numbers occur at the same rpm as the Stage 1 cam, but the curve under peak is higher rpm biased. A gain of 13 lbs/ft and 11 hp were seen, but the bias is at higher rpm. Higher compression definitely helps here, as will exhaust modifications. The exhaust lift is at the max for stock valve springs, aftermarket springs will help in the long run.

Stage 3: "Slight idle (requires high compression and larger bore pistons from stock bore, suggested 10.5-10.8 and 90mm bore), more duration (keeps valves open longer), strong pulling cam for improved mid and upper end power. Stock springs & retainers can be used with stock compression, however the cam needs more compression (10-1, 10.5-1), to make more HP (works well for oval track with high compression). Stock springs and retainers can be used (but not recommended)

** Top performer in upper middle to over 7500 RPMS (must use spring 12-001 to 6500 or spring 12-002 for 7500 RPMS)**"
Duration @ 0.050": 218*Int./226*Exh.
Lobe Separation Angle: 112*
Lobe lift: 0.310"/0.296"
Lift @ valve: .496"/.474"
Not for the feint of heart! This cam requires programming. The idle will be lopey. Raise the rev limiter from 6250/6000 to 6500+ or you'll cut yourself short, if you have other motor modifications. 7500 rpms might be slightly optimistic, but attainable. The peak numbers would be below this, even on a heavily modified motor. You will want those other modifications, such as compression and air flow improvements for best results. Do not use this cam with stock valve springs, you will damage your motor! The peak torque occured at 3500-4000 rpms and peak horsepower occured at 5500 rpm. The gains were 16 lbs/ft and 27 hp. These numbers aren't very realistic, as these are based on a stock motor and externals.

More later...
 

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madjack this is good stuff. have read your rocker and lifter info on jbody,very good info there thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'll be posting more tomorrow, but a few tid-bits for now:
From J-Body.org, as A CLEANMACHINE mentioned, 2.2/2200 OHV Rocker Arm List: http://www.j-body.org/forums/read.php?f=2&i=348365&t=348365#348365

From this forum last year, GM LN2 2.2L/2200 Valve Spring Spec List: http://www.s10forum.com/forum/f105/gm-ln2-2-2l-2200-valve-spring-spec-list-446053/
I'll be hitting the IPP turbo cam in the morning along with the jBodyPerformance.com regrinds, some regrinds I've seen done and hopefully a few of my own designs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Continuing on,

Import Performance Parts (IPP)(continued):

Stage 3 (Turbo):" Lobe Separation 110
Designed specifically for Turbo or Supercharger Applications."
Duration @ 0.050": ?*Int./?*Exh.
Lobe Separation Angle: 110*
Lobe lift: 0.307"/0.?"
Lift @ valve: 0.491"/0.?"

They don't list very much, so it's hard to say what it's like. They do list an advertised duration of 259*(int & exh), which is pretty tame. Most cam manufactures advertised duration cams in this range run about the mid 190s for duration @ 0.050", which is typical for a mild turbo grind. This is rather short for a supercharger grind. The exhaust duration is the same as the intake, which is okay for a turbo grind, bad for a S/C grind. For a turbo cam, I prefer shorter exhaust duration to build a stronger exhaust pulse to help spool up the turbo quicker. For a S/C cam, I like longer exhaust durations to rid the cylinder of the exhaust gases better, for a cleaner intake charge. Also, you need to rid the additional volume of the compressed Air/Fuel charge.
It will have better performance than a stock cam, but what it's characteristics will be is difficult to say. The lobe separation angle is rather tight for my tastes, as far as a turbo or S/C grind goes. I like to build a bit more cylinder pressure and not let it bleed off so much, give it time to work. The intake lift looks decent, especially for such a short duration cam. This is good for a turbo or S/C cam, as it allows for rapid opening of the valve to begin filling the cylinder sooner. I can only assume that the exhaust lobe is the same, since the advertised duration is the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
jBodyPerformance.com (JBP): (http://www.jbodyperformance.com/) I'm not a big fan of theirs. There are many reasons.
First off, they are vague on their cam specs. When I wrote them for more information, they said I needed to buy the cam to get more information. Why the secrecy? Any other cam company is more than willing to share this information, because they know people need this information, if they are properly planning a motor.
Secondly, these are way overpriced regrinds ($373.45 US/$385 CAN) and the want too much for a core charge ($194 US/ $200 CAN)! You can typically goto a salvage yard and get the whole motor for less than the core charge and regrinds are typically $150-$185. To top it off, the cam manufacturers will work with you to design a profile to suit you needs (they do use more generic designs, unless they are like me with more experience with this particular motor. To most this is an odd-ball motor).
Third, they don't have the best reputation. They have been known to not deliver their products for a long time, if at all. You have to order C.O.D., in order for them to ship you anything. The spec of many of their products have not been what they have advertised. A JBO member ordered a "Performance Re-flashed PCM", it turned out to be a stock tune PCM and JBP refused to repair or refund their money. Their valve spring weren't what they advertised. Another JBO member nearly destroyed his motor when the spring bound up, bending pushrods, breaking roller rocker arms bending valves, etc... Luckily the forged pistons were recoverable.

Anyways, off to their cams: http://www.jbodyperformance.com/new/PartDetails.php?partId=297&catId=297&catName=JP0297

"JP0297 - JBP 2.2L Performance Camshaft
Price: [$385 (US$373.45)]Perhaps one of our best attributes is our camshaft design and manufacturing. Our successful camshafts which have been dyno proven to add an additional 15WHP have been improved. Who knows the 2.2L better than JbodyPerformance? Our grind values have also changed to accomodate porting and polishing techniques and match high fluid velocity numbers. This camshaft provides excellent idle qualities and perfect mid-high range torque throughout the top end of the powerband. ALL our camshafts come with a limited 5-year warranty from any manufacturing defects or design flaws. Guaranteed performance, our cams are meticulously designed and perfected. Custom Specifications are free with this camshaft"

Stage 1:
Duration @ 0.050": 203*Int./208*Exh.
Lobe Separation Angle: ?*
Lobe lift: 0.293"/0.300"
Lift @ valve: 0.469"/0.480"
Judging by the amount of lift on this cam, it most likely is ground on a '96-'97 cam, though it is possible to be on '98+ cam, as long as the don't move the lobe centers. Using the '96-'97 L/Cs the cam only made about 6 lbs/ft more torque and no gain on the hp. Advancing th intake 1* and retarding the exhaust 1* (same L/Cs as the '98+) did about the same as the IPP stage 1, except it had 1 more pony at peak. The peak points were identical, but the lower end of the torque curve had a slight bit more toque than the IPP Stage 1. This would be due to the additional lift and quicker ramp rate. Aftermarket springs are recommended with this cam with the '94-'97 motors and required with the '98+ motors, unless you use 1.5 rocker arms.

Stage 2:
Duration @ 0.050": 207*Int./212*Exh.
Lobe Separation Angle: ?*
Lobe lift: 0.300"/0.306"
Lift @ valve: 0.480"/0.490"
Using the same C/Ls as the Stage one, (but his one must be done on a '96-'97 cam) this cam responded the same as the IPP Stage 2 cam, with the same low end bias as the the other JBP cam. It did give one more lb/ft of torque at peak. Tuning is highly recommended and aftermarket valve spring are required with this cam.

Forced Induction:
Duration @ 0.050": 195*Int./192*Exh.
Lobe Separation Angle: ?*
Lobe lift: 0.285"/0.275"
Lift @ valve: 0.456"/0.440"
Judging by the lift, this one was most likely ground on the '98+ cam core. It is actually a decent base turbo grind. As I mentioned in the IPP Stage 3 (Turbo) cam, all the same features and specs apply here, except they applied the shorter exhaust duration. Even my base turbo cam is very similar to this one. It will pull strong right off the line, with a quick spooling of the turbo and pull strong all the way up to the rev limiter (6250/6000 rpm). Turbo cams are typically shorter duration then most N/A cams, due to the turbo continues to build boost further up in the rpm range. This is a decent cam for a properly sized turbo for this motor, such as the size turbos that come in most 2.2L kits(J-Body or S-Series). They do call it a forced induction, but I would not recommend it for a S/Ced motor (No room for one in a J-Body), nor nitrous, which likes a cam similar to a S/Ced motor.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Other Regrinds

Crane Cams HR-208/292-14: This is one I had done by Crane, before the went bankrupt and were bought out by S&S Cycle. (So far S&S seem to be doing Crane Cams justice.) Most of the time Crane does well with their cam profiles. This one was a R&D profile for another independent retailer, but they dropped their the cam program before it ever went to market.​

Here is a copy of the cam card that came with it:


The Specs are:​

Duration @ 0.050": 208*Int./208*Exh.
Lobe Separation Angle: 114*
Lobe lift: 0.292"/0.292"
Lift @ valve: 0.467"/0.467"
This cam did marginally better than the stock '94-'97 cam. On the software, it gained 5 lbs/ft torque, but lost one hp at the peak. The torque curve is much broader and flatter than stock, though. This is typical of a cam of this design, with 114* L/Cs. The broad flat torque curve is better for daily driving, but falls flat at the top end on the track. It also isn't as responsive as other cams can be. Due to the longer (Stage 2 type) intake duration, the idle has a slight lope and if idling too long will throw a DTC P0300, Random Cylinder Misfire. You could do better with many other profiles.

If this cam were ground with the intake advanced 1* and the exhaust retarded 1*, it would wake up this motor. It would have had same low end torque the either of the Stage 1 cams, with one less hp at the top of the Stage 2 cams. The torque curve would not have been as broad as the other cams though, due to the single pattern (same int & exh) profile.
 

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Crane Cams HR-206/313-12: Another member on JBO had this regrind done on a '94-'97 motor for his '94 Cavi. It also is going turbo, but his can be used for a N/A motor.

A photo of his cam card:


The spec come out to be:
Duration @ 0.050": 206*Int./206*Exh.
Lobe Separation Angle: 112*
Lobe lift: 0.313"/0.313"
Lift @ valve: 0.501"/0.501"
This cam was ground on a '94-'97 cam core, with the intake ground 2* advanced. Due to the advanced intake C/L, tighter L/Cs, Shorter duration, higher lift and faster ramp rate, this cam turns out to be a low to mid range brute! It will lope pretty decently and lose about 2"-4" of vacuum. Tuning is a must as are aftermarket valve springs. Higher compression, full free flowing exhaust (header back), P&Ped head with +1 mm valve and bigger TB would really wake up a motor! More exhaust duration would broaden the torque curve, but Crane didn't have a lobe that would fit on the exhaust, without grinding too far. Then again, it was designed for a turbo application (an aggressive one at that!)

On a stock motor it gained 15 lbs/ft of torque at 500 rpm lower than the stock cam. The hp was only up 4 hp, but it too came in at 500 rpm sooner! As I said, the torque curve is brutal for this motor at low to mid ranges. Would work well on a heavier truck, not V6 performance, but really good for a 4 banger of this size.

Like I said before, the owner of this cam is going to turbo this motor. He's using a slightly larger turbo than most kits come with, so it will have a moderate lag, but build increadible toque and power in the mid to upper rpms. A nasty lil 2nd Gen 4 cylinder Cavi!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Comp Cams GM2.2 48/1S/1496S SR14 +4: This was a custom Billet grind, not a regrind! Yes $$$$! This guy's Cavalier is about the Baddest 2nd Gen 4 Cylinder in the World! (No joke about this car!: http://www.j-body.org/forums/read.php?f=46&i=415187&t=415187) This car dynoed at 331 hp/313 lbs/ft torque, while not the most powerful 2.2L, he has more tuning work to do and is in the process of improving the problem of lack of fuel!

Cam Card:


The specs are:

Duration @ 0.050": 224*Int./224*Exh.
Lobe Separation Angle: 114*
Lobe lift: 0.361"/0.351"
Lift @ valve: 0.541"/0.526" (with 1.5:1 roller rockers)
This is not a hydraulic roller cam, but rather a custom mechanical street roller cam, done on a custom billet core. He also is using 1.5:1 roller rockers as opposed to the 1.6 rockers use on the other profiles.

This is his actual dyno graph:


You can see what he's actually done, not really much I can say, the pictures and JBO thread should say it all!
 

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MadJack,

Any advice on how the IPP stage two cam would run with the stock rockers and a stock tune?

You would have the same type of lift as the stage one, if you utilize the 1.54 stockers, just get a little more duration to keep the valves open longer and not have to buy 1.6 rollers.

Building a very mild motor, +1 valves, port and polish, 2.4l tb, cam, bump comp, re-ring and bearings. Would like to keep the stock rockers and valve springs to keep it simple.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It should be fine. You will get about what is described in the cam's review, with a slight loss of torque (a couple of lbs/ft) across the operating range. Without a tune you may need to keep a code scanner/reader available to reset the DTCs (P0300: Random cylinder misfire) from time to time.
 

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Would there be a grind, somewhere in between those two that would help with mid range torque that we could tighten up the duration and avoid the codes?

I honestly do not care if I get the codes, basically I want a little more oomph to be able to hold gear up hills when pulling a little trailer. My clutch is getting weak and the throwout bearing is knocking, so I am getting ready to pull the engine.

I am going to get a cam first, so that I can stuff it in and check piston to valve clearances to determine how much to deck the head and block for compression gains. Then work on the head while the crank and rods are sized.

From my research it does not seem the lift is what causes the issues with the misfire codes but rather mostly the LSA and the duration.

How do you determine what the best balance of these things are, if I may ask?
 

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Interesting, i just called Delta cam to inquire about a grind and they thought the stock 2200 cam was a modular design and can not be ground on.
 

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HR206-313 seems to be a decent choice on a crane regrind.

MadJack I read where you stated:

For N/A purposes, generally (there's that word again!) speaking, the best stock computer compatable cams are in the range of 204*-210* intake duration, with about 6*-12* more exhaust duration, 112*-114* lobe centers and an intake lobe center in the neighborhood of 108*-109*. Almost any of these can be re-ground on a stock cam. Note, I did say generally speaking here, your individual need will vary, depending upon the rest of your motor, your drive train and chasis.

On that Crane grind, I do not understand where they are speccing out the exhaust duration.

But with the stock rockers I would be around .482 lift which would be fine. The intake duration at .050 is 206. I can't understand how to read the exhaust duration.

But the stage 2 cam you listed has a more aggressive duration I think?

So looking at the catalog the only other choice would be the HR3 cam, with the .050 duration at 214. This is probably too much?
 

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Ok, so I have done some more reading and now understand how the crane numbers are read.

I did not realize that the cam lobes between the exhaust and intake were the same on the grinds from crane. Or you can spec out a different grind for the sets of lobes.

While on the subject, what is the advantage or disadvantage of different durations on the intake and exhaust?

MadJack you stated it is good to have a higher duration on the exhaust lobes, can you explain why?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Sorry for the delay, been busy with other things.

Yes it will work.
 
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