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Fever for the Flava
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Discussion Starter #1
ok i bought a fuel filter about two months ago for my 4.3 but never put it on. now im ready. what do i need to do before i start to change it. also i tried changing it once and busted two of my knuckles in the process, it wouldnt come off, is there anything that can help that too. i hope i didnt strip the bolts too much!:cry:
 

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Resident Know-it-all
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Hi blancs9410:

I've recently done mine. It's easy.

First, bleed the fuel system by removing the cap from the valve on the fuel line and pressing the little button (just like a tire valve). The valve is located almost directly over the center of the engine against the firewall. Stuff a couple of rags underneath it to catch the fuel that drips out.

Now the fun part. Under the truck, look inside the driver side frame rail almost directly beneath the driver seat. You will see the fuel filter attached to a plastic bracket bolted to the frame. You will need two different wrenches. As I recall, you need a 5/8" and 9/16" but you should check yours to make sure, because I am going from memory. Most importantly, DO NOT use an adjustable wrench or pliers or vice grips. The filter housing is aluminum and is easily rounded off. If you have access to a set of flare nut wrenches, they work best. The larger wrench goes on the hex boss on the end of the filter (either end, you'll end up doing both). The smaller wrench goes on the fitting that is screwed into the filter. Hold the filter with the big wrench while loosening the fitting with the other. I find it easiest (and least painful) to arrange the wrenches so that they can be squeezed toward each other with one hand. It shouldn't take much torque to break the fittings loose unless someone used sealant on the threads (which you are not supposed to do). Be aware that when the fittings come loose, fuel will drain from the lines. Prepare to catch that in a drip pan.

Once both fittings are removed, you are supposed to be able to push the filter out of the plastic bracket. In my case, the underside of my truck had been sprayed with some kind of undercoating, so the filter was glued to the bracket. I had to remove the bracket from the frame (and remove the other hard lines from the bracket) to get the filter out.

Assembly is the reverse of dissasembly. Be careful not to overtighten the fittings and strip them (remember, the filter housing is aluminum). Check for leaks.

Wear safety glasses because you don't want fuel to splash into your eyes. Also, all kinds of crud will fall off the bottom of your truck as you work underneath, and you don't want that in your eyes either. Keep your mouth closed for the same reasons. DO NOT work under your truck with it on a jack. Use ramps, jack stands, or a lift.

When I did a tune up on my truck, replacing the fuel filter made the biggest difference in the performance of the engine. It was almost completely plugged. It felt like I uncorked 20 HP! Good luck.

Regards,
John.
 

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life begins @ 20 psi
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672 Posts
Great advise so far :D ! About the only thing I can chime in with is you may want to spray both ends of the filter with some penetrating oil like Blaster and let it sit for awhile. When you put your new filter on, smear a little grease on the threads on the filter so it is easier to remove the next time ;) HTH.

Mike
 

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Fever for the Flava
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444 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
sounds good then, one thing when u loosin the filter about how much gas will drain?, and im also having a time trying to find valve on the fuel line.
 

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Resident Know-it-all
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Hi blancs9410:

The filter is in about the lowest point of the fuel system, so you end up draining almost all of the fuel line. I let it drip into an oil collection pan, so it's hard to say how much. If I had to guess, I'd say about a cup or so.

The directions I gave you on finding the pressure relief valve apply to my '96. I don't know if yours will be in the same place. On mine, the fuel line runs up and over the rear part of the intake manifold just in front of the firewall. The valve is near the center and points toward the firewall, so it's hard to spot. If you can't find it, just loosen the fitting on the filter slowly and the pressure will vent anyway. Gasoline isn't very compressible, so the pressure will drop almost instantly and you won't get significantly more fuel dripping than if you had vented it first. When I vented mine, I only got a few drops from the valve so it's no big deal.

You shouldn't need to lubricate the threads or apply any sealant to them. They are designed to seal dry. Lubricating the threads may allow you to overtighten the fittings and cause a leak, or actually make it harder to remove the filter next time. You may also contaminate your fuel. As I recall, the packaging my new filter came in said something like "Do not apply sealant or lubricant to the threads".

The penetrating oil suggestion is a good one. Just be sure you clean all of it off the fittings before threading them into the new filter.

Regards,
John.
 

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Fever for the Flava
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444 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
hey thanks a lot then, great instrutions. im gonna try chaning it today.
 
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