S-10 Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I have a 1992 GMC Sonoma with 2.5L. I’ve tried all methods to release the shaft from the base of the engine (heat, PB Blaster, chain wrapped around the distributor). It won’t move. It feels likes the gears are meshed together on the shaft. Anyone have suggestions? Thanks for feedback!
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Automotive fuel system Automotive exterior

Textile Automotive tire Wood Nail Tints and shades
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive fuel system Automotive design Vehicle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Clamp and bolt removed a awhile ago. It feels like the dizzy gear shaft is locked up.
Best way to get at the gear shaft?
Thanks
 

·
94 4x4,01 Blazer
2001 Blazer 4dr 4wd LT
Joined
·
1,649 Posts
don't try to turn the gear- turn the housing- until you lift the housing- the drive gear is meshed with your cam shaft.The housing could have "welded" itself to the top of your intake- sometimes they can be EXTREMELY stubborn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
don't try to turn the gear- turn the housing- until you lift the housing- the drive gear is meshed with your cam shaft.The housing could have "welded" itself to the top of your intake- sometimes they can be EXTREMELY stubborn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Your explanation is spot on Jayhawke. The aluminum shaft appears bonded or welded to the intake. I’m gonna remove the front tire and fender well to get better access. I use PB Blaster. Is there a better product worth trying?
Thanks again for the ideas.
G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,067 Posts
If your motor has high mileage, the distributor housing and the engine may simply be gummed up with the sludge and any residue buildup inside the motor. When I run into stubborn and stuck parts, I apply heat. You could use some type of small torch or a heat gun. All you want to do is apply sufficient heat to cause the stuck parts to expand and then cool. Essentially, the expansion and contracting action frees them up from each other. Good luck!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top