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gurlz smell
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Discussion Starter #1
Well I just finished swapping rear ends with a blazer. While in the process I left the truck overnight with the rear brake line capped im-properly and ended up spilling a decent amount of fluid. I being the retard I am woke up the next day and finished the swap while forgetting about the fluid level. I hooked all the lines up and topped of the master. Bled the brakes and my pedal feels mushy and goes all the way down, not firm at all. I think it has air in the lines but I bled them a few times and still felt the same. Do I have to bleed the front also? What can I do to fix this problem :(
 

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I'm missing your year and model? Anything fancy about the brakes? Anti lock? Assuming line or lines went empty, it may take a while an you may have to bleed it a couple of times. I believe the anti lock has bleeders also? If thats the case, the master step can be done right there.

If I work on the whole system, such as having to remove antilock or something like a contamination problem, such as might be indicated by mushy brakes, I generally change out every drop of Fluid also. Believe it or not, it gets pretty trashy.

I open all bleeders and pour brake fluid through for a day or two, just letting them drip clean, so to speak. Then I close them all but not "finished" tight. I fill the whole thing. Line bleed the master cylinder. Then line bleed the junction at the rear, the hose has probably been replaced and if the front ones looked anywhere near questionable, they got the same routine.

line bleeding simply means using the line thread in the same manner as the bleeder.

Notice I go from front to back. Directly opposite of the right way to bleed brakes. I am simply trying to move air and fuid in the right direction. Only worried about the bulk of the air and not the final bleeding.

With everything back tight again, I go to the longest line in the rear and bleed that untill i dont see air squirting anymore. Next the other rear, passenger side and drivers side front. This is done in the Bulk method. Meaning I open the bleeder and attach a self bleeder but have the bleeder open pretty good.

With everything closed once again, I will start in the same sequence again. I will not use the little fancy catch bottle and I will only open the bleeder barely enough at each try to have some fluid-air move. I will get the tiny bubbles by watching what is going on carefully rather than believing the catch bottle method.

You may not know, but I am OLD. I like to see it work?? Generally the job is probably finished at the previous stop, but I never believe it is. No matter how good the brakes feel, do the last step and be sure to have a partner that understands what it means to bleed brakes, and listens to your instructions.
 

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gurlz smell
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1,849 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
how do I line bleed the master cylinder?

The brakes now are locked up in the rear and the pedal is only spongy when the truck is on. When the truck is off the pedal get solid, that is after I bled the lines again. I bled the lines till the new fluid was coming through the bleeders. The rear pistons seem to be siezed up against the rotors. This rear end was lying outside for about 3 months before I picked it up. Maybe the calipers have gunk bulidup? Im kinda stumped =/
 

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gurlz smell
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1,849 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
*update*

Turns out the calipers were upside down and had an air pocket trapped inside. Either way the caliper pistons were siezed, so I ended up getting new ones. Put it all together bled the brakes until I saw new fluid coming out and now the system works just fine. The bleeder screw always needs to face up to avoid bubbles getting trapped inside the caliper housing
 
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