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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, 85 chevy s-10 v6 2.8L 4x4 guy here again...bugging you gurus on some more. Do you mind?

The carb definitely needs a rebuild, but I have another issue I wonder if I can fix myself. Maybe it too is carb related.

The gas pedal. I went 40 miles on the freeway last night and my leg actually ached from the tension of my gas pedal\accel cable\?.
The accel cable once broke and was replaced a long while back and always had heavy tension even back then.
I've never seen this in any other car I drove.

Is it the carb (where the cable meets the carb arm?
Is it the cable? I applied white lithium grease as best I could.

Anyway, on top of that, the s-10 is also scaring me in another way - it never seems to get HOT.
The temp guage always reads at the semi lowest reading - always. After a long freeway drive the upper radiator hose only feels "warm"...unusually too warm. Never hot. Same with the radiator cap.

You think the thermometer needs replacing? I know how to replace one, but how can I do it without losing all the radiator fluid.
And what other signs are there that the thermostat is bad?

It has been rather cold here, but still I think something is up.
I do get adequate heat inside the truck though.

thanks,
Joe
 

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Hey Joed, how goes it. I would say it's at the carburetor that you need to lubricate. The throttle cable has enough clearance within the housing that it can move easily enough, unless it is kinked or bent around anything. When the new cable was installed, was it wrapped around any existing parts? A relatively straight shot to the carb should have been maintained at installation.
Try to lubricate the linkage at the carburetor. If it has gotten really bad, may be due to the cold weather. How's the return on the linkage?
As far as the low temp, you may have air in the system or a faulty thermostat. Let the engine warm up and when you are feeling the hose, give it a few squeezes. If you feel the hose get hot all of the sudden, there's air in it. You could also just open the radiator cap and let it run for a bit without it on to make sure it gets evacuated. Check the fluid level as well, of course.
You only need to drain as much radiator fluid as it takes to get below the level of the top hose. No other way around that one.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ok, checked the routing of the throttle cable, seems to be normal - comes out of firewall, up, goes right, then straight to the carb.
I see no reason why this gas pedal is so firm to push\hold. Any other reasons for this?

I put wd40 on the cable (as best i could, no clearance to shoot any inside the cable) and well as on the carb linkage. No real change.

Also, I am getting tired of having to crank her so many times each cold start (average about 3-5 times). Here's what happens exactly.

cold start only:

- short pumps of the gas pedal a few times
- try to start, it fires up...but then quickly dies
- pump pedal once more - either dies again OR fires up to run, but EXTREMELY CHUGGY (to the point where it either dies or just keeps chugging horribly. Alternator isnt in effect at this poor running).
- pump gas pedal, try again..usually starts up - idling poorly but better. i have to give it gas for a minute to get into a proper idle.

Now when it's warmed up, it starts ok and drives pretty well.
In fact, I'm damn impressed with this old mofo (except when on the freeway - not the fastest thing in town).

I checked to see that the choke is operating and fully opening and it is.
The fuel filter has been changed.

To note:
Since it's rescue I've tried many different fuel\carb cleaners in the tank. Last one I tried was Seafoam. The others were vavoline maxlife fuel sys cleaner, and a couple times with chevron fuel system cleaner.

I'm noticing a little better gas mileage - but this may be due to my change in gas brands (used to always use arco 87 oct, tried texaco, 76, or shell 87 oct now and seems to be "a little" better. Am I crazy here, or is arco gas just horrid? i could be crazy at this point - cause I can't beat this last few problems.

thanks again for any help
 

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Alright, I'll go at bat again.
My truck is the same way, in terms of starting. It dies the first time after initially pushing the pedal to the floor, then on the second time it runs fine. Also, sometimes, very rarely, it does the chugging thing you describe. Hasn't happened lately though. This is with a new(rebuilt) Rochester carb.
Is the timing in spec? Also, has it had a tune up?
I would not use WD-40 on the linkage at the carb. I'm still sure that's where the issue is. I would try DuraLube or something that stays on a little bit better than WD40 and also work the linkage back and forth by hand quite a few times between sprays. The other thought that came to mind was whether the return spring on the carb is the right one for it. I don't know the history of the vehicle, but maybe the previous owner replaced the spring with a shorter or stiffer one(?). How is the return on it?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Doc, I bet you're right about that return spring.
I'll just get a new one anyway as the one on it is very old.
I bet it'll fix it just fine.

But now I have bigger fish to fry...

THE TRUCK WON'T START. :(
Oh shit.

All I did was take off the air filter and housing, spray some lube on the linkage (although I did use WD40), worked it by hand.
I didn't unhook any vaccum except the obvious ones that go on the air cleaner housing.

It cranks (starter working, battery working...but I havn't been able to make it start all night.
I would like to think all i did was flood it, but it seems like something more.
It's not getting fuel?

I even tried some pyroil in the carb - no go. Then i tried a little gas in the carb - no go. Just cranks away but no start.
I stopped after a while, I didn't want to burn anything out.

You think some WD40 might have gotten in the carb? Could this cause this anyway?

Nothing changed really, just what I described. It's been starting and running quite well (except for the before mentioned).

Anyway, i'll try and start it tomorrow, but I'll have to tow her to the closest garage if no luck.
This is ridiculous.

thanks for your help though man. Seriously.

JD
 

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Discussion Starter #6
ALSO...

Tried it again. Same problems - it cranks away as normal but no start (no fuel?).
I've tried it while holding and flooring the pedal (no pumping), just won't fire up.

I'm thinking this is a fuel delivery problem (fuel pump) but I'm wondering if I should check anything else out before condemning the fuel pump.

More questions:

Is there anything electrical I should check first relating to the fuel pump? I wonder if I broke\bumped any connectors?

Are there any relays for this type fuel pump? (engine driven)

Any fuses I should check such as the ecm-b? (although, i think only TBI or fuel injected would have this problem).

on firewall, just right of the pass side heater blower motor, there is a 3-pronged plug. What is this? I did take this off to check the contacts, but I put it back on.

(Grabbing at straws here)
 

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No, the 2.8 in our '85s had the mechanical fuel pump and don't involve any relays. There is a pushrod that pushes the spring and plunger of the fuel pump to get it to pump fuel. A lobe on the crankshaft drives the pushrod. I've worked on a Dodge Ramcharger whose crank lobe had worn, so we installed an electric fuel pump b.c the mechanical one was useless. Sorry, side story.
The plug by the blower motor shouldn't be for any ignition component, but next time I'm under the hood I'll give a looksy.
Don't tow it to the garage!!!! Just pull the spark plugs and let the engine sit for a while. Also take the air cleaner off. You just flooded it when working the linkage back and forth. It'll be alright in an hour or more. Mine did the same exact thing, and I ended up pulling all the plugs, letting it sit for a while, and when put everything back together, it fired right up.
Yeah, the frustration begins to mount at times like these (heh, my username). Just breath deep and tap the third eye.
 

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Alright, just went outside and checked the connector at the blower motor and it is actually for the AC compressor. It has a connection further down that leads right to the compressor.

I'm going to throw out another suggestion. You're definitely right about the fuel delivery problem, but this is for further down the road when you have nothing to do and money burning a hole in your pocket. The 8mm wires and coil in my sig did make a difference for me and my 2.8. I noticed slightly better gas mileage (we're talking tenths here, but every little bit counts, went from 13.6 or so to 14.2 or so, all DC driving) and did notice real world increase in throttle response, not just my imagination.
Just wanted to give a recommendation for the next time it's time for a tuner up. Wires and coil from Jegs cost me around $88 including shipping.

Alright, back to the real problem. The only connections at the carb that I can think could be loose are for the electric choke (on the driver's side) and the one for the screen that sits underneath the carburetor. It doesn't have too much effect in this conversation, but just to be aware of it is important. It's the connector that juts straight out the side of the carb, near the choke. However, right now it's just a flooded carb so no worries about those.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Sorry for more Q's.

So you don't think it's the fuel pump? How is one supposed to be sure if it's the problem if it's a mechanical pump btw?

>>> There is a pushrod that pushes the spring and plunger of the fuel pump to get it to pump fuel. A lobe on the crankshaft drives the pushrod. I've worked on a Dodge Ramcharger whose crank lobe had worn, so we installed an electric fuel pump b.c the mechanical one was useless. Sorry, side story. <<<<

Can you tell me about this? is this on the carb or on the fuel pump itself?
Don't know what a crank lobe is - where is it and how did you know it was worn again?

Well, I'll try pulling the plugs (didn't do that yet) and let it sit.
But I have let it sit overnight, tried Pyroil (starting fluid) in the carb and it still wouldn't fire (shouldn't it at least fire with this?). It IS cranking though.

I've worn my battery down to the ground trying to start it now, so that needs to be recharged. So I'm not sure it's worth it to recharge and keep this cylce going (won't I ruin the starter?).
It's been a lot of times trying to start (after letting it sit) is why I ask.

You say don't tow it to a garage so you seem to feel it's the plugs all fouled up.
Man, I would LOVE to avoid this, but I think it might be inevitable. Something seems wrong here, and I'm fearing something worse than a broken fuel pump or fouled plugs.

BTW: this thing is totally tuned up: New sparks, spark cables, new rotor\dist, regular oild changes, tranny fluid changes, new air filter, new vaccum lines for the carb, new PCV valve, new fuel filter. Everything was operating great (except for a little rough starting when cold which I gather now is normal for these).

You think my fuel filter, although brand new, is fouled up already?

But..
I'll try your advice and pull all the plugs first.
All of them? right?
Let it sit while I charge the battery. Pull the air filter off.

So am i trying to start it correctly? floor the pedal and hold it while cranking? Or should I not touch the pedal at this point when cranking?

I'm gonna take some pics of suspect parts (can't take one of the fuel pump - too hard to reach).
The car is old and never had the engine steam cleaned, so prepare for some ugliness there (lot's of oil).

thanks,
JD
 

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Oh no, I'm not ruling out the fuel pump. The coil and the wires was just something that I found helped the overall performance of the 2.8. Sorry, didn't mean to mislead.

The pushrod of the fuel pump sits right behind the fuel pump itself. There is a hole/cylinder that allows the long spring assembly of the pump to slide into the block. The pushrod sits back in this cylinder and gets pushed by the crankshaft, which has various lobes or offset circular protrusions along the shaft (drill an offset hole into a series of quarters, insert a straight paper clip through the holes and lock the quarters in place, and then turn the paper clip). The lobe turns so that it pushes the pushrod forward, which is then assisted back to its original position by the spring and plunger of the pump. To get a worn crankshaft lobe takes a good bit of work. I don't know how the guy that I worked with managed to do it, but I have yet to see the problem pop up on our 2.8s. I believe that he was told it was worn by a shop. Don't know how they tested it and found that to be the problem, but I doubt it will be the problem in this case. Maybe it is just the fuel pump itself. Is it the original one? I'm looking to change mine sometime soon as well.

Even with the ether (starting fluid) being sprayed in, the plugs may be so saturated with gasoline that it won't be able to ignite the more flammable vapor. It's happened to me on various smaller displacement motors (motorcycles and yard machines).

In order to prevent overheating the starter solenoid, don't crank for more than 6 seconds and give a good 10-20sec between cranks.

Yes, I meant to say remove all the spark plugs (take note of which wire goes where!!!) Once you put the spark plugs back in and have everything hooked up, DON'T give it ANY PEDAL AT ALL. That's for the first crank. When you try a second time, push the pedal to the floor, but release it immediately. Don't hold it at the floor or anything and try again. To activate the electric choke you just need to push the pedal through its travel, not hold it for a long time. The only time the pedal would be held to the floor while cranking the motor is if the carb is flooded. That way, the fuel is flushed out of the carb and also from the cylinders more rapidly. If it doesn't start the second time, I would not push the pedal again. The choke light should be on and it should still be activated, so pushing again won't really do anything but risk flooding it again. I do not believe the fuel filter is clogged again. If you are getting fuel to the cylinders, you'll know when you pull the plugs and you should be able to smell it at the carb.

Yeah, I say don't tow it to the shop just out of despiration. I understand what you're saying about it possibly being something more, but with this I don't think it is. The beauty of our year truck and engine is that the problems can be a lot more simple than the TBI and computer controlled ones. Air, Gas, Spark. Those are all we really need. You're getting Air, should be getting Gas, and probably still have spark, it's just being covered over by the first two. If there's no spark, then it could just be the ignition coil wire is unhooked or the wire from the distributor to the coil is loose. You've done a complete and thorough tune up, so we'll assume that all is well.

Heh, heh. I have pictures of my old block AFTER I cleaned it w/ engine cleaner, carb cleaner, and tons of water from a hose and it still looked like it had been dipped into an oil well. No worries about how oil-coated it looks, been there.:D
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
got all six plugs out...
jesus they were black with oil and gas, all wet.
The plug holes are extremely gunked up with oil\gas as well.

I sprayed some carb cleaner on them, wiped them as best I could and left them to dry while I charge the battery.
If I have this kind of black wet oil and gas...is this pointing to any other serious problems (besides my flooding it in the first place)?

You say about an hour huh? It'll be longer than that after charging the battery, which should be ok.

I've heard of flooding the engine in past vehicles I've had, but I've never really had to pull the plugs out. Rather just let it sit a while and it would fire up.
Are you also thinking it needs to dry up a bit in the cyclinders as well.

If it doesn't start, I'm either looking at the distributer and rotor (which is new) gone bad, or the spark cables, or the ignition coil or lastly the fuel pump itself. That about sum it up correctly?

If it is the fuel pump, what do you think the chances are I can pop a new one in myself? (two bolts and three hose fittings).
I see where it is...but it's a royal pain in the ass to get to - located at just the right spot to make you want to push it off a cliff.
Looking at your truck, what way or angle would you attempt to get the old one off and the new one on?
What all is involved with this?

Or should i definitely have a shop do it (which means - tow time).

thanks
JD
 

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I was cracking up with the first few sentences. I had the same reaction with my old engine.

More than an hour would be great. I let mine sit overnight and everything went back to normal. I advised pulling out the spark plugs for exactly the reason you noted, so the cylinders could also dry out. Also, it gives the spark plugs a quicker dry out time.

If you're finding oil along with the gas, make sure that you identify exactly where on the spark plug it is. When I pulled mine, I thought I was having piston ring failure on the number 5 and 6 cylinders, but looking closer I realized the oil was only around the threads, with only gas on the electrode and tip and that oil had accumulated only within the recess of the spark plug holes, so when I removed the plugs, the oil got wiped down the threads of the plug. That means that I have a slow leak at my valve covers towards the back, the harder bolts to tighten. It makes sense since I had pulled my valve covers to adjust the valve lash a month or so ago and never put on new cork gaskets. Make sure that the oil is only on the threads and if it is, then it's most definitely a leaking gasket somewhere. If the tips of the plugs are fouled with oil as well, then ring failure may be starting. However, you would notice the really bluish smoke at start up if that were the case. Another way that oil could be getting burned up is if there is a clog in the PCV system, but that accumulation starts at the carburetor and you've cleaned all that.

If it still does not even give the slightest interest in firing, then I would go to ignition equipment. The plugs were soaked in gas, so at least we know it's getting fuel. I would say the wires are fine, as are the plugs (another side note, soaking spark plugs in a little cup of gasoline for a few hours cleans them really well also) and also the rotor and distributor cap should be fine. Since those are all components that have been replaced, failure so quickly isn't something too likely to occur. That leaves only the coil and the fuel pump since those are the only ones that haven't been touched yet. If gas is getting to the cylinders (back to the sparkplugs being soaked), then ignition is the problem with the coil being a possible source. The Haynes manual I have shows a good illustration of how to use an Ohmmeter to see if the coil is bad. I can post a scan of it (if I can figure out how) or email it if you need it. If you want to give a little bit of a "nudge" to the combustion process, spray a verrry quick shot of ether (starting fluid) into one of the cylinders before you put the plugs back in. Maybe even just on the tip of one of the plugs.

"located at just the right spot to make you want to push it off a cliff." HAHAHA! Don't get me started about the upper two bellhousing bolts on these trucks! I would say that you can definitely do it yourself. The angles may be bad, but it is definitely doable with a moderate amount of cursing. I had the benefit of having the new motor sitting outside of the engine compartment when I reinstalled the fuel pump, but it seemed pretty easy:) I can check tomorrow to see how bad it is once the engine is where it's supposed to be and let you know, but it should be really easy. I can also scan the page from the Haynes, but the only new info would be about expecting the pushrod to fall out once you've got the fuel pump removed and a few other items:
"1. First, isolate the battery by disconnecting the (-) cable
2. Detach fuel inlet hose, outlet line, and vapor return hose. Hold fitting on the pump with a back-up wrench as the outlet line is disconnected. Also, if possible use a flare-nut wrench on the fuel line fitting
3. Remove the two mounting bolts and detach pump. As the pump is removed, the pushrod may fall out-be sure to retrieve it.
4. Remove gasket and mounting plate
5. Remove traces of old gasket and sealant with scraper, clean block mounting surface w/ lacquer thinner or acetone
6. Apply dab of heavy grease to pushrod to hold it in place as the pump is installed"

The last steps are just putting on the gasket and reinstalling the pump, torquing to spec and attaching the lines. Oh yeah, and checking for leaks:)

Can you tell I have a strong aversion to having it towed away? I think the money issue is just a sore spot with me. I don't like the idea of the lost money on a tow before any work has even been completed. Or, the loss of a free AAA membership tow (I burned through my brother's three in the span of two months; he shouldn't have left the card on the table).

Sorry for not acknowledging it sooner, but your welcome. It'll be running soon enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
True test is tomorrow morning. Yikes.

>>> Another way that oil could be getting burned up is if there is a clog in the PCV system, but that accumulation starts at the carburetor and you've cleaned all that. <<<

I just replaced the pcv valve, I didn't do any real cleaning on the carb. Maybe some shots of carb cleaner uo each vacc lines, choke, linkage etc., but nothing involved as say opening the carb up and doing a full clean\rebuild.

Hmm...something going on? It should have been mainly gass. I could have sworn that I saw oil and gas on everyspark plug (not just on thethreads). It was pretty bad.
I'll do a doublecheck on it when I resintall everything.
Think it will just happen again right away?
What else could cause the oil to be sent all over the place like this?
 

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Morning Joed. Do the shots of carb cleaner after you get it started, not before as that carb cleaner makes it harder to start an engine. I think the engine should just fire up at this point, but then I may have just been fortunate.

If there's oil getting thrown into the combustion chamber and over the spark plugs, it may be either worn rings or worn valve sleeves and seats. It's easier to pull the top end out than the entire engine, so I'd say it's just worn valve and cylinder head components. Oh yeah, I meant to ask how many miles are on the engine?

I hope that it works out this morning. If not, heh, I'll still be here.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
130 on the miles.

I'm hogging all the posts here - sorry, almost done.

Well, tried it again and nope - same problem. Cranking but no start.

So this either points to the ignition coil or something?

I'm looking to see if there's anything I may have bummped off or something? Or can a fuse be popped somewhere?

here's a link to some ignition:

http://www.painlessperformance.com/manuals/90501m/90501Sec07.htm#90501 7.4

Doc, i have a feeling I may have screwed something up electrically (to cause no ignition all of a sudden).
Liek I said, I put contact cleaner on that odd 3-pronged plug between the blower moter (it isn't ON the blower motor btw) and contact cleaner on these two interlocking plugs\connectors that reside on the passenger side of the carb (not the one coming outof the carb).

described best I can - these two plugs interlock and have two prongs each. Behind the air diverter valve, has two plugs and a plug where the center distrib spark cable plugs into.
What are these? what are they for? my haynes manual says nothing about it. They have two wires leading off each plug. Inbetween each connector is where the center spark cable connects. On the plugs the wires are: Brown\pink on one, tan\red on the other.
All I did was put pop them off (lock tab on either side) and put contact cleaner on them, then pooped them back on.

This is why I suspect electrical probs - but i can't tell if this contact cleaning caused this or my lubing the carb linkage.
I'm sorry I'm not as well versed in ll this, hope I'm describing this well.

The other 3 pronged plug (just right of the blower motor and mounted on a small PCB board) looks like a relay of some sort. Has springs\coils on one side the other ends lead to the 3 prongs for the plug) So maybe you misunderstood when I first described it.
Well i unplugged this too to put contact cleaner on it - I found out that it hangs there with nothing holding the prongs but the plug itself. When I unplugged it, the prongs fell out and I had to put it back, then attach the plug.
Like you said, i don't think this 3-pronged piece is the cause, but I thought I'd mention everything I did last.

I do now suspect the other two plugs I mentioned above (the center spark cable resdes between these two plugs).
All i did was put contact cleaner on them and put them back on - i'm pretty sure they are on correctly - they only go one way.

Just trying to avoid towing it to a shop and try and figure out what may have happened, but I'm thinking this may have to be looked at my a tech. i could have popped something worse just by contact cleaning these plugs 9since now we found out it's ignition related).

I bet I'm not getting any spark, and that center spark cable isn't firing possibly due to unplugging those plugs (???).

Man, this part isn't mentioned in the manual, so I'm havign a tough time describing it. Let me know if you understand the plugs I'm talking about.

thanks
 

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Hey Joed. no worries, that item you are describing attached to the air diverter valve bracket is actually the ignition coil. The wire leading to the center of the distributor cap is carrying the current from the coil to the distributor cap and rotor button.

The two plugs that you mentioned, one leads from the distributor to the coil and the other....well, I can't remember off hand where that leads to, probably the starter. The pink and brown one should lead to the distributor. I don't believe it's possible to hook them up in the wrong position, but it is possible to not have them clipped down completely. Sometimes the inside edges of the plugs catch the edge of the socket collar and don't go down all the way. Pull them off and then put them on one more time. I think that you can put them no one at a time, but there's an order to it as the connectors attach to one another by sliding into place. Try that and also the test for the coil.

I don't believe that just spraying a little contact cleaner into the plugs could mess up the coil that quickly. I did the EXACT same thing on mine before I attached everything to the new motor and I didn't have a problem. Do you have access to an ohmmeter or voltmeter? I can send a scan from the Chilton's manual that shows how to test for a bad coil. That at least will tell you if it has failed. I will send it via email as soon as I get home.

No worries, if it's just ignition, not too much that could have gone wrong. Work on those coil connections until I can send the email. I'd love to just post it up on this thread, but the files are always too large when I try to scan them.

You haven't been bad or anything, have you? :nono: Maybe Santa's punishing you or something:p
 

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Here is the scan from Haynes
 

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Here is the info from the book, as the file was getting too large to copy with it:

"Check
Check the coil for opens and grounds by performing the following three tests with an ohmmeter (see illustration)

-Using the ommeter's high scale, hook up the ohmmeter leads as illustrated (#1). The ommeter should indicate a very high, or infinite resistance value. If it doesn't, replace the coil.

-Using the low scale, hook up the leads as illustrated (#2). The ohmmeter should indicate a very low, or zero resistance value. if it doesn't, replace the coil.

-Using the high scale, hook up the leads as illustrated (#3). The ohmmeter should not indicate an infinite resistance. If it does, replace the coil."

The caption to the right of the illustration was cut off, but it reads:
"To check the ignition coil, use an ohmmeter to perform the following three checks (if the coil fails any of these tests, replace it)...."

And on it goes to describe what has already been written.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hey Doc, Merry christmas to you and yours!

Thank you for your time (and amazing patience) with all this.
You could have just ignored it all and saved whatever time it takes to reply.

I'll try and make those checks. I have a multimeter, but I must admit, I have no idea how it's used (other than checking batteries).

What setting am I to use for these checks on the multimeter?

What exactly am I going to touch to test these mentioned in your manual? I guess I'm confused as to what these represent when I go to my truck.
Is the point at the top left in #1 a ground (-)?
What are each of these exactly (so I know I'm doing it correctly).



:boobies:

JD
 

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Merry Christmas to you as well Joed!! Hopefully all will be well since the spirit should be on your side (sorry, saw Elf yesterday)! Also, patience became a huge necessity with all the problems I've had with my vehicle(s) :)

I brought in my old coil from the shed and tried to use my multimeter as well. I turned it to the Ohm (omega symbol) setting and tried to get the leads into the sockets. I ended up placing the straightened ends of paperclips (gently!) into the slot(s) I was testing since the probes would not fit. Of course, that affects the reading of resistance, so if you can make the probes fit, do so however you can. The negative probe on mine has a slightly flatter end (incident with a hammer)

I determined that although the picture shows four slots per socket, it's just to clarify that the leads during each test are distinct. So, on the first set up I showed no change in my multimeter's initial readout of O.L with the scale on the bottom showing full value going on to infinity. That was with the (+) lead going to the illustrated ground and the (-) going to the first slot. I then switched my leads and came up with the same thing.

On the second illustration, I placed the (+) lead against the top left slot and the (-) on the bottom right slot and obtained a value that started at around 6.54 and then proceeded up to around 13.64 as I continued to hold it at the leads. Holding it for longer, I noticed the value would fall and then climb, never reaching higher than a 13.7 ohm value. Of course, I have no idea what that means, but I figure it constitutes a very low value so is still good.

On the third test, I placed the (+) lead on the top right slot and the (-) lead on the plug wire terminal. I obtained a value of 0.955 ohms. I feel this constitutes a value that does not approach infinity and so the coil is still good.

Now, I may be reading the scale wrong on my multimeter. Hell if I ever used it for anything other than testing batteries and charging systems or used the setting before, and I can't find the instructions. Still, I feel that the values are good and that the tests show a good coil (I know that mine was still good when I removed it to install the Accel Coil). But also keep in mind that I used paperclips in the sockets (the smallest ones that I could find that would still make contact with either side of the contacts within the sockets) and so it may affect my readings somewhat.

Did you get a chance to check the connections at the coil? It's odd that the dang thing would just quit all of the sudden.

Alright, I finally found the coil test in the Chilton's manual, and it show essentially the same diagram except that it does not have four slots per socket. I was correct in assuming that the Haynes drew it that way for clarity, as the Chilton's illustrates:
 

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