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Discussion Starter #1
So after a couple of months worth of trials and tribulations with work, sickness, family, and weather I've finally been able to continue repairs from head gasket blowout. Got the head back today squeaky clean and no warp or cracks. Good news. Got gasket set from rock auto felpro for $20 on sale hurrah. New head bolts on the way. What I need is advise on preparing block. What's best way to clean the bolt hole threads. And getting deck surface ready. Guy at shop told me to put a drop of oil in when I do the head bolts. Is that right. Sorry for the story. And thank you
 

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Give them a shot of brake cleaner to get the junk out. Not sure if you need a little oil on the threads for an accurate torque reading or not.
 

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time to get cereal
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Thread chaser, a tap, or at the very least an old head bolt threaded in and back out will clean the threads. Usually GM recommends thread sealer even if the holes don't go into water jackets. I don't have the service manual for an S10 but other GM service manuals recommend it. Personally, I didn't use thread sealer when doing mine. Never heard of using oil though.
 

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the new guy
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Oil will make tour torques wrong. Dry is the way to go, unless its noted other wise, and when i did my 98 2.2 during this passed summer, i never found anything saying to oil the bolts.
 

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Procedures change over the decades...used to be a thing back in the day. As far as I'm concerned...anti-seize is my friend these days.
 

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time to get cereal
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Oil might be ok with an all iron engine, but with an aluminum head and having to stretch bolts I don't think it would be a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The Haynes manual says to use sealing compound on the bolt threads. The old bolts didn't look like anything was on them. I'll blast the holes out with brake cleaner and run the old bolts in and out since I dont have a chaser or tap and die set. Plastic scraper and acetone on the block deck to clean it up sound good?
 

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Before you do anything stuff rags into the cylinders to catch as much crud as possible.
I like to run the fine side of a quality bastard file across the deck to catch anything the scraper missed. Your not trying to file it down, just cleaning it. Fine scratches actually help the gasket seal.
Just before you put the head on turn the engine over a couple times and wipe the bores with a rag soaked but not dripping acetone to remove as much dirt as possible. Then wipe them with a clean oil soaked rag to lube them a bit.
BTW use the Haynes manual in the outhouse. What they don't omit they get wrong most of the time.
How can you cover everything for 10 model years of a vehicle in 300 pages when the factory manuals for one year are thousands of pages?
If you want to put something on the threads ARP sells a special lubricant for bolts that doesn't effect torque values but prevents galling and seizing. If you can find it locally it's about $2 otherwise:
 

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time to get cereal
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Are you being sarcastic, or are you just being thick? Can never tell in these forums, lol.
 

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I have a question about replacing head after having it milled. Does it throw off your valve settings removing a couple of thous. of an inch off the head? How is it remedied?
 

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It's mostly BS
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I have a question about replacing head after having it milled. Does it throw off your valve settings removing a couple of thous. of an inch off the head? How is it remedied?
The hydraulic lifters supposedly can adjust for up to .010 milled off from original. If you have more than that, you can use a shim, use a thicker gasket, or use custom length push rods.
 

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And about torque to yield head bolts from Felpro:


Using engine oil, lightly oil the threads and under the heads/washers on T-T-Y bolts unless otherwise specified by the vehicle service manual. Clean, oiled threads prevent binding, allowing for accurate and consistent torquing. Be careful not to over-oil the bolts, especially if they are threading into a blind hole. Too much oil will hydrolock the bolt and give false torque readings. Any bolts that pass through a water jacket must have a sealer applied to the threads to prevent corrosion and leaks.
 
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