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Recharging an AC

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Old 04-08-2005, 04:15 PM   #1
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Recharging an AC

Before my grandfather died, I watched him recharge several auto air condtioners. I never payed close enough attention to remember the procedure...

Anyone know where I can find a how to?

I have a vacum pump, and the guages, and i know that the small pipe is the high pressure side and the bigger one is the low presure side... but I dont remember much of anything else.
Old 04-08-2005, 04:34 PM   #2
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Re: Recharging an AC

it would be better if someone sat down and showed you
Old 04-08-2005, 04:51 PM   #3
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Re: Recharging an AC

Yea thats true.

I just found this though: http://ca.autos.yahoo.com/maintain/a...tioning_2.html
I remember doing all that stuff now.

RECHARGING THE A/C SYSTEM

CAUTION: The high side of the A/C system is under considerable pressure. If a can of refrigerant is connected to the high side service fitting, it may explode! The system must therefore be recharged by using the low side service fitting only. If you are not sure which fittings are which, do not attempt to recharge your air conditioner yourself. Wear eye protection and avoid direct contact with the refrigerant as it can cause frostbite on bare skin.

The basic recharging procedure goes as follows:

1. Identify the low side service fitting.

2. Determine the type of refrigerant required by the system. On most 1993 and older vehicles, this would be R12. On most 1994 and newer vehicles, it would be R134a.

CAUTION: R12 and R134a refrigerants are incompatible and must not be intermixed. Use the type of refrigerant required for your A/C system only. On most 1993 and newer vehicles, there's an identification decal or sticker that tells what kind of refrigerant is required. Also, the size and design of R134a and R12 service fittings are different to avoid cross-contamination.

3. Connect a can of refrigerant to a gauge set or recharging hose and valve set. Follow the equipment supplier's directions for making the connections.

4. Open the valve momentarily on the gauge set or hose to blow all air out of the line (this is necessary to keep from introducing air and moisture into your A/C system).

5. Connect the gauge set or hose to the low side A/C service fitting on the vehicle. This is usually located near the receiver/drier or accumulator, or suction side of the compressor.

6. CAUTION: Make sure the can of refrigerant is held in the upright position so only vapor enters the line. Do not tip the can sideways or upside down as doing so will allow liquid to enter the low pressure side of the A/C system (This may cause damage to the A/C compressor). Also, never heat the can to make it empty faster as doing so may cause the can to explode.

7. Start the engine and turn the A/C system on high. The compressor should be engaged or cycling on and off (it may be necessary to jump the compressor clutch directly to the battery if the system is extremely low on refrigerant to keep it engaged). Compressor suction will pull refrigerant vapor into the system and slowly empty the can. This can take up to 10 minutes or more, so don't be anxious.

8. When the can is empty, disconnect the charging hose from the service fitting. Use care when disconnecting the "empty" can from the gauge set or charging hose as it may contain some residual refrigerant.

9. Add additional cans of refrigerant as needed until the system is properly charged.

CAUTION: The most common mistake made by do-it-yourselfers is overcharging. Too much refrigerant can reduce cooling efficiency just the same as too little refrigerant. To work properly, the A/C system needs just the right amount. Always refer to the system capacity specs in a shop manual or other source to determine how much refrigerant is required. System capacities are specified in ounces. One can of refrigerant equals about 14 oz. Usually three to four cans is enough to fully recharge a typical passenger car A/C system that was empty. If the system is low, one or two cans of refrigerant are usually all that's required.
Old 04-08-2005, 04:55 PM   #4
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Re: Recharging an AC

kewl. don't blow up you a/c system
Old 04-14-2014, 03:23 PM   #5
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Re: Recharging an AC

Quote: Originally Posted by marcusm88
Yea thats true.

I just found this though: http://ca.autos.yahoo.com/maintain/a...tioning_2.html
I remember doing all that stuff now.

RECHARGING THE A/C SYSTEM

CAUTION: The high side of the A/C system is under considerable pressure. If a can of refrigerant is connected to the high side service fitting, it may explode! The system must therefore be recharged by using the low side service fitting only. If you are not sure which fittings are which, do not attempt to recharge your air conditioner yourself. Wear eye protection and avoid direct contact with the refrigerant as it can cause frostbite on bare skin.

The basic recharging procedure goes as follows:

1. Identify the low side service fitting.

2. Determine the type of refrigerant required by the system. On most 1993 and older vehicles, this would be R12. On most 1994 and newer vehicles, it would be R134a.

CAUTION: R12 and R134a refrigerants are incompatible and must not be intermixed. Use the type of refrigerant required for your A/C system only. On most 1993 and newer vehicles, there's an identification decal or sticker that tells what kind of refrigerant is required. Also, the size and design of R134a and R12 service fittings are different to avoid cross-contamination.

3. Connect a can of refrigerant to a gauge set or recharging hose and valve set. Follow the equipment supplier's directions for making the connections.

4. Open the valve momentarily on the gauge set or hose to blow all air out of the line (this is necessary to keep from introducing air and moisture into your A/C system).

5. Connect the gauge set or hose to the low side A/C service fitting on the vehicle. This is usually located near the receiver/drier or accumulator, or suction side of the compressor.

6. CAUTION: Make sure the can of refrigerant is held in the upright position so only vapor enters the line. Do not tip the can sideways or upside down as doing so will allow liquid to enter the low pressure side of the A/C system (This may cause damage to the A/C compressor). Also, never heat the can to make it empty faster as doing so may cause the can to explode.

7. Start the engine and turn the A/C system on high. The compressor should be engaged or cycling on and off (it may be necessary to jump the compressor clutch directly to the battery if the system is extremely low on refrigerant to keep it engaged). Compressor suction will pull refrigerant vapor into the system and slowly empty the can. This can take up to 10 minutes or more, so don't be anxious.

8. When the can is empty, disconnect the charging hose from the service fitting. Use care when disconnecting the "empty" can from the gauge set or charging hose as it may contain some residual refrigerant.

9. Add additional cans of refrigerant as needed until the system is properly charged.

CAUTION: The most common mistake made by do-it-yourselfers is overcharging. Too much refrigerant can reduce cooling efficiency just the same as too little refrigerant. To work properly, the A/C system needs just the right amount. Always refer to the system capacity specs in a shop manual or other source to determine how much refrigerant is required. System capacities are specified in ounces. One can of refrigerant equals about 14 oz. Usually three to four cans is enough to fully recharge a typical passenger car A/C system that was empty. If the system is low, one or two cans of refrigerant are usually all that's required.
I think my compressor is cycling off and not allowing R134 to enter the low side...I am getting a 100psi reading when I plug the AC in...I would imagine this would lower if the AC was running.... How do I jump the compressor to stay on?? The manual says add a jumper wire but I am not sure how to do that!
Old 04-14-2014, 06:10 PM   #6
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Re: Recharging an AC

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lglPJuBXVeE
Old 04-14-2014, 09:36 PM   #7
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Re: Recharging an AC

Great video! Unfortunately I do not have a intake gauge set or vaccum pump.

1)How can I tell if my AC compressor is engaging?(I do hear a click and my RPMs jump)

2)Why am I at 100psi on the low side with no cold air?

3) Why wont freon go into the system from the Can? If I spray it when its not hooked up to the car it flys out of the can freezing anything in sight!

4) How can I personally evacuate AC my system
Old 04-14-2014, 10:36 PM   #8
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Re: Recharging an AC

#1 the compresser has a clutch watch the end by the belt if its spining its engaged
#2 google too see how much pressure it takes to engage pump
#3 same as #2
#4 legaly you can't - certified tec only - all freon has to be contained and disposed of properly
Old 04-14-2014, 10:41 PM   #9
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Re: Recharging an AC

Showing 100 PSI with the AC off usually means too much air in the system. It's probably cycling off because the pressure or temp is getting too high because of it. Take it to a shop and have it properly evacuated and refilled.
Old 04-14-2014, 11:00 PM   #10
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Re: Recharging an AC

Attempted to jump the AC compressor and still a no go... So I checked the fuses and the little 10 amp AC fuse was blown under the hood. Replaced it with the left turn signal fuse for now and the compressor fired right up. Re charged with a half assed can of R134a and I am at about 25psi on the low end now. Ice cold. What would cause this AC fuse to burst like that?
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